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RetroCrush, Cinehouse and Midnight Pulp Now Free on STIRR

DMR ad-supported linear and VOD deal provides international premium content in classic anime, horror/thriller/action and arthouse and independent cinema.

Digital Media Rights (DMR) announced a deal with STIRR to expand its recent entry into the linear, free advertising-supported television (FAST) space. STIRR, an ad-supported, live and on-demand streaming service, will carry three of DMR’s streaming video channels which can be accessed via iOS and Android devices, as well as Amazon Fire TV, Apple TV, and online at www.STIRR.com.

Under the initial agreement, STIRR is adding RetroCrush (classic anime), Midnight Pulp (horror/thriller/action), and Cinehouse (arthouse and independent cinema) to their lineup. This marks the linear premiere of both RetroCrush, which DMR launched as a streaming VOD channel this past March, and Cinehouse, a brand that has only been available via the company’s social media channels.

“We are excited to partner with STIRR to launch two new linear FAST channels and expand the reach of Midnight Pulp,” commented DMR co-founder and CEO, David Chu. “Over its first year in business, STIRR has shown tremendous growth while engaging with consumers across America, and we look forward to helping the platform expand its channel portfolio through the curated content on which our company has built its reputation over the last decade.”

“DMR has a host of content not offered by others in the space, and their channels are going to bring some of the most popular cult classics to the STIRR platform,” added STIRR director of content acquisition and business development, Ben Lister. “Our audiences have come to expect STIRR to offer a wide variety of free programming, and this partnership furthers that mission.”

Initial Programming Highlights

Each channel showcases international premium movies and other entertainment content, in their respective genres. 

RetroCrush:

  • Memories - Three visionary sci-fi short stories by Katsuhiro Otomo, the creator of Akira, are brought to life by the top animation studios in Japan. Featuring a script by Satoshi Kon and direction by Otomo.
  • Lupin III: Legend of the Gold of Babylon - It is thugs vs. thieves when Lupin & Co. go up against a bevy of baddies in a trans-continental trust-nobody trek after a treasure of biblical proportions!
  • Appleseed - An elite swat team works against the clock to stop a terrorist plot in a utopian city run by a super computer in the original anime classic from 1988.

Midnight Pulp:

  • Office - From legendary director Johnnie To comes this one-of-a-kind corporate culture musical set during the 2008 financial crisis. Chow Yun-fat and Tang Wei star.
  • RiffTrax: Wonder Women - RiffTrax stars Mike, Kevin and Bill (former stars of Mystery Science Theater 3000) give their comedic riffing to this campy 70s action classic.
  • Ryuji's Journey: The Crest of a Man - The new head of a powerful family faces danger from an evil rival out for blood in this Yakuza classic.

Cinehouse:

  • Alexander the Great - One of the most dazzling personalities in history, Alexander the Great was also one of its greatest commanders. His openness to the foreign cultures of the lands he conquered provides a timely touch to this lavish docu-drama.
  • Anna Karenina - Vittoria Puccini, Santiago Cabrera and Benjamin Sadler star in this lavishly produced limited series adaptation of Leo Tolstoy’s classic novel.
  • Peep Show - Academy Award-winner Olivia Coleman stars in this classic British comedy series about two dysfunctional friends (David Mitchell; Robert Webb) sharing a London apartment who go through the ups and downs of life.

Earlier this year, DMR launched its first linear FAST channels via the Samsung TV Plus platform: AsianCrush (pan-Asian), Cocoro (kids/family), KMTV (K-pop), Midnight Pulp and YuyuTV (general entertainment). The company is in active discussions to expand linear distribution of these, as well as Cinehouse and RetroCrush, in the coming months.

Source: Digital Media Rights

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