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So you want to be an Animator? Here's what to expect.

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Let's see...

-30K-40K on average as an animator/artist in this biz
-60 hour work weeks are common
-layoffs are common
-short-term gigs are the norm
-being ripped off of pay will happen
-relocation is a strong possibility

besides the usual answer, "because we love it", can someone explain how to make a living as a human being in this field? Can someone explain how an artist will build equity for themselves? How will they improve the certainty of their futures? How will they find a partner (husband/wife) and have a family if that's what they'd like to do? Where will that time or financial foundation come from? Or are they ok with being in mid-life with no equity, no home, no family- just living gig to gig for maybe a bit more pay than they started?

Young people can be exploited at 60 hours a week for 600 bucks pay.. because they don't have families, aren't married, aren't yet into "real-life" stages. I myself am young but have passed the 20-s stage where I thought that it was animation or death for me, lol. My path just didn't lead to it full-time, that's all. There are just so many more options out there to do, why someone would give their life away to sweat under a hot lamp at a small animation table for 60 hours a week is obsurd, plain and simple. What's left after that? Sleeping and eating, maybe? Life is too short for that.

But contrary to the overall belief here, a "real life" does exist outside of this animation thing and it just seems that that real life can not be accessed while working in a studio "harvesting crops" for obsessive hours for little pay.

You love to draw? Then DRAW! Do it part time! Do it freelance! Start your own biz!

Do animated murals for kids' rooms in your community! Set up consession stands at festivals, carnivals, markets, weddings, etc and promote and sell your work!

Stop expecting the world here with this animation thing- get this obsessive behaviour out of your heads, it's becoming like OCD..

I have been out of animation school for 5 years and have worked as a part-time freelancer ever since.. having some incredibly busy months, and some other not-so busy months. I have done a ton of different things, all at my own time, my own hours, etc. I have went into strangers' homes and painted their childrens' rooms for good pay, I have done caricatures, I have done children's books, portraits, logos and other stuff. it's been quite exciting, sitting in people's living rooms, discussing job details and other jobs they'd like done, etc.- and visiting other towns for other clients, having some clients I've never met, etc- Not to mention my day job (which has nothing to do with art_- the amount of comissions I've received from there has been great)- there's a nice balance when you spread your talents out other than centralizing it all on one thing and ibsessing over it. Without this course of action for the past 5 years, I'd never be where I'm at- if I had pursued a full-time animation gig, I know for a cold hard fact I wouldn't have built my life to where it is right now.

I just wanted to break the obsessive-train-of-thought on this animation thing- to make others aware that there are LOTS of other things you can do as an artist, and so many that probably make much more sense. You can go get a part-time job slugging cases in a warehouse, or waitng tables, or whatever- and then use the rest of your time to tend to your art, or your family, or what have you. It's a nice balance, giving a break from eachother. And the money keeps coming. There's no shame in taking on a "survival job" to pay your house and car, and then making even some more money on top of it doing what you love.

What's wrong with being a part-timer for 5, 10, 20 years? Think of all the adventures that'll be coming your way! And all the hope.. who knows who's gonna see you one day and ask you to come commission a huge job... it;s exciting sometimes!

The end-all-be-all attitude of animation is hogwash- there are many, many other options as an artist.

I'm still a newbie at all of this, but with a few years experince, I can also say that it's extremely hard to get going as an artist, but once you slug for a little while, people talk and spread your name. And yes, little pay has definitely been a factor for me more often than not. Difficult clients? Right now I'm dealing with one- and am just about to cast them away and just not bother with them- again, life is too short to lose my hair over someone like that. I still have all kinds of doubts, and this nagging feeling of just "not being there yet" in terms of an art career, but something tells me that feeling will be with me till retirement, lol!

Just keep your eyes peeled and think "ouside' of the animation box.. look at the many other alternatives as working as an artist, using your skills. Part-time self-promotion is a great way to go, get yourself a part-time day job while you get moving.. just because you aren't into this animation biz "full-time" does not in any way mean you aren't a legitimate, talented artist!! You can move in so many other directions.

Ever see the portrait or caricature artists at fairs, conventions, weddings, malls, etc? Ever see the lineups they have there and the wads of cash they pull out of their aprons when giving you change? These guys are making great coin.. many of them clearly look like they are trained as animators but chose to do something a little different... no bosses, no deadlines, no 60 hours a week. And still artists by profession.

There are just so many other options, so for the students who are considering animation school, think twice- think what else you could be doing as an artist as well. T

The end-all-be-all attitude of animation is hogwash- there are many, many other options as an artist.

Yep, and that's the part that scares the livin' sh*t out of most aspring talent.

Years before I turned pro, I was reading advice from other cartoonists: diversify, do not bottle-neck. Become as "fully-functional" as you can as a cartoonist. I tried to take that to heart and its served me well over the past 20 years.

Yet many newcomers, students and schools appear oblvious to this.
There's a LOT of niche talent out there ( its why I grouse so much about drawing skills with 3D people--they are an asset!) and these folks are setting themselves up for a fall when the trend changes.

Most of this is due to intimidation--it takes a lot of time, effort and there's a lot of rejection and failure before successes come.

Oh well.

That's how you make a living...a good living doing this professionally.
I've long said a lot of people want the job title that says "animator", but not a lot are prepared for the demands of the job. Its not just moving stuff around and imparting a bit of acting--there's a lot of peripheral things that come into play--and that's just ONE job.

I inbetweened for 6 years. That was a job. I know people that have done it all their career. Then their job inbetweening got canned because Disney closed, or stopped utilizing inbetweens. I took on and learned storyboarding, as an adjutant to my love of comics. I became a teacher. I'm looking into learning painting, sculpting, other crafts.
I have a sizable number of skill-sets already on my resume, and more will not hurt.

That came from thinking long-term a long time ago, a mindset that did a world of good for me this unstable biz.

But like you said, do anything you can to make your way.
I've done magazine illos, T-shirts, CD covers, CD-rom games, Text book illos, caricatures, comics, packaging designs, ad art, written articles for magazines and newspapers, consulted.......you name it.
Do whatever it takes.

"We all grow older, we do not have to grow up"--Archie Goodwin ( 1937-1998)

And because you've done so many different things, that's what encourages me. I want to realize that there are so many different avenues to take, and to get away from the one-track-mind way of thinking: like, "it's either animation or nothing". Or, "I'm going to be a caricature artist or nothing".

Doing different things not only keeps your mind fresh and your options open, but opens you up to lots of different people and different jobs, (in my experience so far, freelance).

I'd hate to think it's a 'status' thing, where artists might be concerned with how they are tagged, such as an "animator" or "Special FX artist" or something like that, or maybe what's more important is getting their name on the end credits somewhere in small, small print 3/4 down the massive list.

Because then it's not about being an artist anymore, it's about 'status', which is just materialistic now.

It's encouraging to know that Ken has done tons of different things, because that's the way I've gone so far in a few short years and although I'm frustrated at times by thinking I don't have that full-fledged 'career', I certainly have enjoyed the freedom of doing so many different things under my own deadlines for the most part. the additional cash for it all has been really nice, too.

I say just keep your vision out of the tunnel and keep it at 360 degrees.

I just wanted to echo what Rawbbie is saying - he is dead on right. In the last year or so I got really interested again in animation - since about 1991 when I graduated college.

But I have a family, a house, and kids. I can't just change professions now. But I went ahead and learned Animation:Master and did a little film for fun and it was great. Now I am drawing a lot and am going to do some 2D animation for fun, the first I've done in over 15 years.

If it leads to something I can do on the side - great. If not, I will enjoy it - and *I* will be in total control of what I am doing. I'm already having a great time with it.

Good luck.

Contrary to the last couple of posts, I have only had good experiences as a full time animator. If you get into a good place then you're set.

There are many jobs out there for the talented newcomer, and it has never been easier to learn from experienced people.

I'm betwixted and between all of these posts. I work full time as a graphic designer with enough variety to keep things interesting, layout, a little web, lots of photoshop, illustrator, and I do the occassional portrait on the side as well as photography - I'm shooting a wedding this weekend ...

But I want to animate! I want to do it full time. The other uses of my talent, at the moment, feel like an annoying interuption of what I'd rather be doing.

I have a family, 2 kids, a husband, 2 dogs, a turtle and a house to maintain - it frustrates me no end that I **CAN'T** do an internship to get my foot in the door. I hate that I can't obsess over my school projects and have to make do because of other committments. The best students in the school with the best stuff work their asses off. I think total immerssion will get you up and over the steep animation learning curve faster then spreading your talents out.

I say, obsess, go for broke, push it as far as you can while you can because otherwise you're settling for less. Do everything you can do - truth is you're probably doing it anyway - we all need to eat and pay rent. But the opportunity to work 60 hours for cold pizza is a small window in your lifetime and THAT work is probably what will get you a full time gig.

I tend to agree with B'ini in that if you are young and unfettered you should totally go for broke and go for it if you are sure this is what you love and you want to do. I made the mistake myself of not really following after what I wanted. So now I am trying to fill it in, like B'ini but it is really hard - there's so little time.

Flip burgers during the day if you have to, live in a rat's nest (or at home if you can) and just see if you can make it. You'll know when it's time to fish or cut bait. Because believe me, 20 years later is a tough time to find out you should've yinged when you yanged.

And B'ini... do what you can. When you have 10 minutes, draw, or animate or paint or whatever you are dying to do. It may be only 10 minutes or a half hour or an hour here and there, but it adds up and you'll be surprised what you can accomplish.

>> 20 years later is a tough time to find out you should've yinged when you yanged.

I just love this! It's perfect!

I think I had a strong response because just before I started this semester I found myself backing off, adjusting my parachute, looking for the safest route to go after school. It suddenly hit me I was at the same crossroads 15 years ago when I was doing CAD and 3DStudio and wanted to pursue animation. Back then it seemed like you had to be an MIT graduate to get in the biz, so I stayed in the corporate world.

I will say, all these years later with the kids older, I'm kind of glad I'm starting now. I figure I have 20-30 years ahead of me to learn how to animate - and believe me it will take that long.

I'm not saying I have any regrets taking the path I took. Just that I've doubled my efforts instead of pulling back.

Wow... you guys are a really great help. You've all pretty much answered any questions i can think of, but would anyone be interested in an interview? (I need to interview an animator for a high school project) It would just be through e-mail.

I'm pretty much in the same boat as b'ini--graphic designer, wife, two kids (no dogs or turtles) and coming into animation twenty years later than I should have. The difference for me is that I'm not really looking to work as a full-time animator (my drafting skills are limited, though improving). I keep hammering away at a short I'm working on--if I can finish it, submit it to a couple of festivals and begin working on the next one, I'll be quite happy.

I agree, though, that if you're young, have the desire and a little talent, then go for it. You'd be surprised how long a person can survive on ramen noodles and kool-aid.

It seems to me that focusing your energy is fine if you are busting your butt with a skill that translates into all sorts of careers. Take drawing, if you work hard for 10 or so years or so drawing you will end up with the ability to work in animation, illustration, as a fine artist or a zillion other things. If you spend 10 years doing 3D animation (assuming not much drawing involved) learning computer programs that become obsolete every 5 years then you will have no flexibility. That will become a problem 10 years latter when your job gets outsourced and your skills don't translate. Artists and Illustrators are less effected by outsourcing than a pure animator because their work is generally directed towards a certain niche market and is something that often requires the understanding of the culture of the place they are living in and working.

It is also not really just an issue of job security, it may be that after a while you just get tired of either the studio system, your underdeveloped personal life, or animation in general. If you are 25 there isn't a way to know what you will be feeling when you are 40. Even if you accomplish everything you want to do as an animator will you accomplish everything you want to do as an artist?

*sigh*

I haven't read these posts for a while, and it's all been very inspiriational!

I'm in London, just graduated, but feeling very blue lately. I did not draw for months, till a few days ago. I was going through a phase where I was clutching my knees and rocking to and fro in a dark room thinking, what the hell am I to do now?!!?!

I did some work experience for an animation company, which was very nice, and then panicked! Bills to pay, I have my rent, hope my parents are happy while I pursue this, how about a MA, or a course in 3D animation, should I stop altogether and get a 'normal' job, was 4 years in uni wasted? ...blah blah. Then after this scooby doo moment I came to my senses.

Life is too short, you got to just go for it. There will be times where you get kicked in the teeth on several occasions, might have to live in a hovel and eat pot noodle for a while, but hey... bring it on mate! A few words from Joe Esposito (Karate Kid rules)...

[I]'Fight 'til you drop
never stop
can't give up
Til you reach the top (FIGHT!)
you're the best in town (FIGHT!)
Listen to that sound
A little bit of all you got
Can never bring you down

You're the best!
Around!
Nothing's gonna ever keep you down
You're the Best!
Around!
Nothing's gonna ever keep you dow-ow-ow-ho-how-ho-own'[/I]

Sorry if this is a bit OTT, but I am elated that I am back on track.

~Don't Give Up!~

I did not draw for months, till a few days ago. I was going through a phase where I was clutching my knees and rocking to and fro in a dark room thinking, what the hell am I to do now?!!?!

I get like this all the time. Like..............DAILY!

I used to think there was something wrong with me ( actually I get twinges of that too) until a colleague of mine showed me a two panel cartoon that showed the same damn thing: the artist cowering in the corner.

It practically a manic thing for me, there's times when the stuff flows off the fingertips and then there's days of unbridled hell when the drawing demons see fit to stall everything.

Its not easy to do this stuff professionally, I'll never sell it as such. It can be a great career but animation can be a harsh, petty mistress as well.

"We all grow older, we do not have to grow up"--Archie Goodwin ( 1937-1998)

I get like this all the time. Like..............DAILY!

I used to think there was something wrong with me ( actually I get twinges of that too) until a colleague of mine showed me a two panel cartoon that showed the same damn thing: the artist cowering in the corner.

As odd as it sounds, I'm glad to hear this. It's good to know I'm not alone.

Mine manifests itself in never being able to take a compliment about my work seriously. I keep waiting for the other shoe to drop.

Maybe this is the genesis of a whole new thread - what are your professional and creative fears and phobias? Time for some dirt-cheap group therapy! :D

As odd as it sounds, I'm glad to hear this. It's good to know I'm not alone.

Mine manifests itself in never being able to take a compliment about my work seriously. I keep waiting for the other shoe to drop.

Maybe this is the genesis of a whole new thread - what are your professional and creative fears and phobias? Time for some dirt-cheap group therapy! :D

Go for it.

I'll see your 3 neurosis, and 2 schisms and up the kitty with 4 more phobias.

Lordy knows I have enough to bank with.......LOL!

Actually there is some benefit to newcomers in professionals discussing the psychology of our various jobs, more than just "we love it/we hate it".
The travails and triumphs are worth reading to see the less-considered human aspect of the work.

"We all grow older, we do not have to grow up"--Archie Goodwin ( 1937-1998)

My specialty is in comparing myself to end-all be-alls in the back of my mind, usually unintentionally, despite the fact that I've just begun my formal education. I also do some side work of privately collapsing emotionally when a normally acceptable criticism is received alongside a billion other stresses from everything else in life. At my deepest points, before any professional experience, I have actually cried on two separate occasions trying to fight off the monster that is an unhealthy and unsupportive level of self-criticism.

It's nice to be on the other side though. Things like that will always happen in various proportions, but once it's done it's done and given the indirectly personal nature of the work (how's that for a weird phrase) it isn't a bad idea to be a little hardened.

What if I want to be a boarder?

I was just curious how Mr. Ken Davis, and anyone else here who does or knows someone...ended up becoming a storyboard artist (the steps, circumstances at the studio, etc.)

I'm a little lost about where I should/can start my career here in the US. I went to anime school in Japan, then worked for an animation company in Tokyo for a year and a half, doing a wide variety of jobs from inbetweening to somehow directing TV episodes. My ultimate goal is to direct here in the US (I know, very pie in the sky...) The thing is, if being an animator is not my end goal, is that where I should start?

Out of all of my duties, I've enjoyed storyboarding the most. Is there a career path towards becoming a storyboard artist? ...Can it lead to directing?

I'm still a total beginner in this business, so any thoughts or advice would be much appreciated! Thanks.

I was just curious how Mr. Ken Davis, and anyone else here who does or knows someone...ended up becoming a storyboard artist (the steps, circumstances at the studio, etc.)

I'm a little lost about where I should/can start my career here in the US. I went to anime school in Japan, then worked for an animation company in Tokyo for a year and a half, doing a wide variety of jobs from inbetweening to somehow directing TV episodes. My ultimate goal is to direct here in the US (I know, very pie in the sky...) The thing is, if being an animator is not my end goal, is that where I should start?

Out of all of my duties, I've enjoyed storyboarding the most. Is there a career path towards becoming a storyboard artist? ...Can it lead to directing?

I'm still a total beginner in this business, so any thoughts or advice would be much appreciated! Thanks.

I started out as an inbetweener, but really wanted to be a comic book artist.
Because I'd devoted a lot of energy to understanding comics, and showing a lot of that kind of work to my colleagues and such, I was given a shot at storyboarding by teaming up with a more senior animator who was doing a freelance 'board at the time.
I fell into storyboarding from that point on.
My first solo-boards were pretty bad. I didn't know what I was doing as far as camera moves go--but I did know and understand the 180 degree (camera axis) rule--for the most part. I could stage a shot and depict action and emotion. Fortunately, on that first solo0board I was blessed with a 'Board supervisor would took some pains to explain to me a lot of things.
My revisions were covered in RED marker, but I made the fixes and learned from that point on.
One job led to another job, led to another. If you can get 5 boards under your belt, you can get 10, if you can get 10 then you can do 20 and on upward the count will go.

Best way to get into it is to do storyboards. There's scripts on-line, board a few script pages worth--so you have a sample that's about 40-50 poages long.
Show that you can stage a shot, obey the camera axis rule, understand camera movements, can pose out action clearly, and label the board properly.
Do a few samples in different styles/genres and you'll show some versatility that should get you work.
That's pretty much all it will take.

If you want to do 'boards, show that you can do them.

"We all grow older, we do not have to grow up"--Archie Goodwin ( 1937-1998)

Thanks for your advice Ken. I'll definitely continue working on my portfolio and working in different styles. Now that I'm back in the States, I've got to attempt some non-anime designs!

Wow.

I've spent the last 2 hours reading this thread word for word. The diversity in this thread is exactly what I needed to read.

My issue. Point Blank Form:

-30 years old. Married 4 years (together 8). No children.
-Have previous schooling and portfolio is mainly - web and print.
-2D/3D is my passion. Gaming is my passion.
-I have been drawing since I can remember.
-I'm in a booming Oil and Gas Industry in Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
-Proof that money isn't happiness.
-I want to attend an entry level course that touches base on all genres/avenues of the gaming industry, while I beef up my portfolio in 3D
-Main concern. 2 cities in Canada. Vancouver and Toronto. I have to sell my house, relocate and buy a house in that market, and attend fulltime school.
-I am leaning towards Toronto for education at these institutes:

http://postsecondary.humber.ca/proglist.htm - scroll down to MEDIA

http://aac.senecac.on.ca/index_content.html - which I don't know.

http://www.wherecreativitygoestoschool.ca/artinstitutes/toronto/programs/media_arts/game_art_design.aspx - for the broad spectrum. To find the road/avenue I want to go down. Model? Map design? etc...

I am leaning towards the art institute. Use that to beef my resume as I expand my portfolio and hone my skills.

Here is my dilemma. I know what industry I want to tackle, explore, be a part of and grow with. Hence either Van or TO. The wife is successful graphic designer (BA and MA and gaggin' to get me to TO for ages obviously). She wants Toronto. (USA is not an option btw-timeline dosent permit it) I have to make this decision, apply with my portfolio and get the house on the market by Jan 2007. Ya, makes for happy-hairy-hectic holidays.

If I go to Toronto? I can pay for my education cash and put a boatload down on a house near downtown - bc of this insane economic boom and housing price increases in Calgary.

If I go to Vancouver? I have a massive (one hour minimum one-way) commute bc downtown Van is yes, more expensive. Hence less down, hence student loan, whatever.

You'll have to excuse me, I'm not making this out to be a cash issue. But moreso, one of freedom to get the best education for myself, beef a portfolio, and the free time to rock it out and be able to pay my side of the bills.

I know this is a small bomb in this thread and I've poured allot of myself as a stranger? But my deadline is less than 60 days. This the best researched and opinionated thread I have come across.

I respect all your opinions and advice.

Please fire me your thoughts. I gotta' make a "snap judgement that is well thought out."

Thx all!

Gerry.

I'm not entirely convinced the school you choose matters. As my grandma says, "Everything works out in the end." Figure out where you really want to go, and choose a path that goes there. The path you choose doesn't matter as long as it is feasible.

...OK, I lied. The path you choose does matter. Career means "life work". You are essentially choosing your future. Things change, but that makes the calculation way too complicated. Would you rather live in Toronto or Vancouver? Is the student loan a big deal?

I am leaning towards the art institute.

After all that ranting, I realized that you answered your own question. =)

Good luck!
-Brendan

-I am leaning towards Toronto for education at these institutes:

http://postsecondary.humber.ca/proglist.htm - scroll down to MEDIA

http://aac.senecac.on.ca/index_content.html - which I don't know.

http://www.wherecreativitygoestoschool.ca/artinstitutes/toronto/programs/media_arts/game_art_design.aspx - for the broad spectrum. To find the road/avenue I want to go down. Model? Map design? etc...

Skip Humber. The program is (a) new, and (b) too thin. You'll end up with a certificate no one knows about and may not acquire the skills you want.

Seneca's program seems pretty comprehensive (from a quick perusal).

AI has a bit of a checkered reputation (in general, not Toronto specifically), although I think most of that comes from their open enrollment policy and varying levels of student commitment/drive.

Contact either (or both) schools and ask about graduate placement. Get specifics from them, not percentages. Where have they placed graduates and in what jobs. AI's site made me nervous when it said it provides training for entry level jobs like "game tester". My 18-year-old high school graduate son is currently qualified to be a game tester... I'm not ragging on AI or trying to discourage your interest in them - really!

Wherever you go, you'll get out of your education what you put into it. Don't let other students' work habits/motivation influence yours. If you go at it with the intent of squeezing every opportunity out of your education, you'll do fine.

well...you are scaring me..wiht the negative aspects
though I am not afraid of hard work..
but I do get scraed when no results come out,even after that...

What to expect?

Well.........you can expect to work harder and longer hours than in most other jobs.
You can expect NO job security, instead your skills and developed talent will become your job security. You can expect to travel to work in another city at some point.
You can expect competition from other people, both before and after you get a job.
Do not expect to make a lot of money, but you should be able to support yourself once work is steady.
Expect work to be seasonal, in the respect that projects ( games and shows) have starting and stopping times and there's not always another project following it up.
Expect to work for people that, at some point, will not know what they are doing--most do, but there's a few out there that do not.
Expect to really bust your ass in getting the best training you can, it developing your ARTISTIC skills as well as computer skills. Expect that mediocre skills will land you mediocre to no jobs--accomplished skills will give you better options. Do not shirk at talent.
Expect to get stiffed on pay at some point in your career--it might not happened for a long time, it might only happen once, but its VERY likely to happen.
Expect fear, frustration, sweat, accomplishment, elation, joy, devastation etc.--the gamut of human emotions.
Expect to love the job and hate the job at the same time.

hello

hi all,
well my story goes like this....
I have done HND,higher national diploma in electronics and communication
and want to persue a career in...animation ofcourse(thats why I am writing here)
so the problem is pretty simple...
where to start...
and would my diploma hold any good to me!
I am doing a adegree course too...but thata doesnt count, till my college gets affiliation!(yeah!my hard luck..I got stuck to this place)

anyways,it will be huge help...if someone can guide me what I shud do!
I want to do it from arena multimedia...

but...the thing is, that I am a little confused...
CAD and CAM are interesting..
but animation is also my cup of tea
can you pls pls pls help me!!

and one more thing...can I join at this point of time...

help plz

can anyone pls help me...

hi all,
well my story goes like this....
I have done HND,higher national diploma in electronics and communication
and want to persue a career in...animation ofcourse(thats why I am writing here)
so the problem is pretty simple...
where to start...
and would my diploma hold any good to me!
I am doing a adegree course too...but thata doesnt count, till my college gets affiliation!(yeah!my hard luck..I got stuck to this place)

anyways,it will be huge help...if someone can guide me what I shud do!
I want to do it from arena multimedia...

but...the thing is, that I am a little confused...
CAD and CAM are interesting..
but animation is also my cup of tea
can you pls pls pls help me!!

and one more thing...can I join at this point of time...

can anyone pls help me...

If you're looking for specific advice, it's going to be hard for anyone here to help you. Personally, I have no idea what a HND is, or why some of your schooling won't count until your college has affiliation. It sounds like the school structure where you are is very different than where I am.

As far as general advice: decide what aspect of animation you want to pursue (there are many), and do some research into that area. If you want to work in web media, for example, then find out what programs and packages are used to produce work for the web (Flash, HTML coders, etc). If it's 3D, download a training app and dig in.

It's also vitally important to study animation and filmmaking theory and practice, no matter what arena you want to work in. Know the 12 principles of animation, cutting, staging, camera placement, the 180-degree rule, etc. The more you research, the more information you'll turn up.

For animation-specific information, here's a good place to start... Read everything in the Notes section.

thanks

hi,
I would like to research on this thing...thats true!
but dont know where to start, I would look at the things, you have suggested...but I hope you would help me out too..to know what exactly would be of my interest!

If you're looking for specific advice, it's going to be hard for anyone here to help you. Personally, I have no idea what a HND is, or why some of your schooling won't count until your college has affiliation. It sounds like the school structure where you are is very different than where I am.

As far as general advice: decide what aspect of animation you want to pursue (there are many), and do some research into that area. If you want to work in web media, for example, then find out what programs and packages are used to produce work for the web (Flash, HTML coders, etc). If it's 3D, download a training app and dig in.

It's also vitally important to study animation and filmmaking theory and practice, no matter what arena you want to work in. Know the 12 principles of animation, cutting, staging, camera placement, the 180-degree rule, etc. The more you research, the more information you'll turn up.

For animation-specific information, here's a good place to start... Read everything in the Notes section.

I don't think we can help you Princess. It sounds like you are still unsure of what you want to do, multimedia, animation, or CAD CAM. Once you make a choice and pick what you want to do, then maybe the members here can help you with school and programs to look into.

Aloha,
the Ape

...we must all face a choice, between what is right... and what is easy."

ahem ahem

I don't think we can help you Princess. It sounds like you are still unsure of what you want to do, multimedia, animation, or CAD CAM. Once you make a choice and pick what you want to do, then maybe the members here can help you with school and programs to look into.

Aloha,
the Ape

not true...what you just wrote!
I am pretty sure what I want to do, but reading the responses, I feel that there is much more depth to this field..than it shows on the outer
and since you people have been "in" there, I only hope to better and practical help
I do not know, if someday if will be writing a story, or helping up for a animated movie..but yes, I do not want to be missing out anything thats in my potentiall

hi all

well..I came to this forum with a lot of expectations..
I read ppl's reviews, and found a lot of things!
I am sure..someone would help me out!
as far as the HND or higher natonal diploma is concerned
it is a part of Edexcel,UK
I dont have a degree yet, so I am concerned..if I would be able to get in..this field!!
pls..help guys!

not true...what you just wrote!
I am pretty sure what I want to do, but reading the responses, I feel that there is much more depth to this field..than it shows on the outer
and since you people have been "in" there, I only hope to better and practical help
I do not know, if someday if will be writing a story, or helping up for a animated movie..but yes, I do not want to be missing out anything thats in my potentiall

Fascinating thread....I have never been published nor can I say that I've never fought the darkness in a lonely room. I can't say that at 41, I have it figured out, I can't say that I have been drawing everyday since getting my B.A. 4 years ago, but I can say that things in life have always found a way to work themselves out. As I go through the well documented mid-life crisis, a few things become apparent. First, you are going to soul-search and question most everything about yourself, and your place. Second, there is no way to know how it's all going to work out. And third, If you don't follow your dream (whatever it may be) what will you feel 10 years, or even 20 years from now? There was a little bit touched on as to having your own project. Personally I think it's a great idea. I recall the first time I found Oddworld on the web, not much then, just an idea with a pretty well realized set of contributions. Now look at how far it's come? Be an animator, or an illustrator, or a graphic designer, or a trench digger...It doesn't matter to anyone but you.And that is all that matters...

If you don't follow your dream (whatever it may be) what will you feel 10 years, or even 20 years from now?

A good idea to keep in mind. It's what motivated me to pursue my MFA so I can teach at the college level.

In 10 years we're all going to be 10 years older - what counts is what you did with that time.

A good idea to keep in mind. It's what motivated me to pursue my MFA so I can teach at the college level.

In 10 years we're all going to be 10 years older - what counts is what you did with that time.

that's exactly what I am planning to do nexr year. I feel if i was around academics for my day job, life won't be so mentally difficult, politics aside...

Interesting..

Princess - from what you have written, I have a few suggestions. Your HND is a start.

Animation studios (in London anyway) are interested in your drawing skills, ability to use a variety of computer programmes and experience. Try getting as much work experience if you are still studying. Maybe do a runner job to see what it's like and get a general feel for things. Work on your portfolio/showreel and make it gooood. Enter competitions and what not.

http://www.skillset.org/animation/

It paints a pretty picture, it might help you, it might not. If this does not interest you, you are probably going after something else. Knowing what you want helps, but sometimes that is not the case, so all I can suggest is to research.

Oh yeh... the whole thing about sitting in a dark room, has much to do with being bipolar. I kind of agree with you Ken, for me anyway being manic = I am now super animation girl, kick some ass, watch me draw, draw draw draw, don't sleep, burn out, relax, then unfortunately for me I find myself hugging my knees again waiting for the sky to fall on my head. A process I will enjoy for years to come. It's fun being creative!

Chins up skallywags. All is well.

~Don't Give Up!~

A good idea to keep in mind. It's what motivated me to pursue my MFA so I can teach at the college level.

In 10 years we're all going to be 10 years older - what counts is what you did with that time.

exactly, some people waste their time and some others cherish every minute!

Here is my story: I just finished my BFA in Animation from a horrible college. I am making my demo reel just now. It is a short story in flash. I want to become a storyboard artist/animator. I want to take another storyboard class, because the one I took back in college was really bad. Since I went to a bad college, I am afraid of choosing colleges again. Does anyone know any good storyboard classes in California? Am I moving on to the right direction? I don’t want to waste my times again. Please help. :(

"Ecploring Storyboarding" by Wendy Tumminello is a text book. You should get on the phone and talk to the department about their classes.

Thank Wontobe! I looked up a school. GNOMON school of visual effects. Anyone heard of it? http://www.gnomon3d.com/coursesnew/analog_production/storyboards.html

well...you are scaring me..wiht the negative aspects
though I am not afraid of hard work..
but I do get scraed when no results come out,even after that...

You're scared, huh?

I would hope so.

Do not enter into this field without a realisitic expectation of what it CAN be like-that is the whole point of this thread.
The point is not to drive you away, but to equip you with a healthier perspective than ignorant enthusiasm.
Patronizing newcomers with false hopes would be a disservice to them and everyone.

Seriously, I've said throughout this thread that if this kind of thing intimidates you, then this career is probably NOT for you.
Good luck.

"We all grow older, we do not have to grow up"--Archie Goodwin ( 1937-1998)

well yes..
I do not have any idea..what it would be like..
but as I said, I am not afraid of hard work..

hey...but what about replying to the question I asked!!
can U pls answer that too

Thanks

Animator?

I want to be an animator like what others did in tv and in internet but I need to study more and learn more in animation!

Thank you guys!

Wel Sai Ken.
You have explained both the ends of the Career.

just wondering how long contract lasts in animation companies

also can we renew out contract after it's done

just wondering how long contract lasts in animation companies

also can we renew out contract after it's done

I wont to add to this question, how much effort should be put into a contract? Should the contract be taken as is or is there room for customizing.
I wont my green M & M's. :D

Thanks for this very useful thread. I am a straight talker myself and truth (without rudeness) is always better than candy coated fairy tales.

I am in animation school and should be finished up in 4 months. I feel I could use another 6 months training but it is what it is. I'm working hard at my weak areas, time (and eventual employment?) will determine how well I have done. I am 47 with family. Grew up in a home where art wasn't considered a real job so I've detoured through many other jobs and businesses to get back to the point where I decided to return to the fork in the road and try the road untraveled. I chose animation because I am at heart a story teller and the classes covered a broad range of subjects that interest me. My goal is to eventually be able to tell my stories, and since I wasn't born rich the best chance to get them out there is to learn the ropes and get them started myself.

bupaje, congratulations on your impending completion. I admire your decision to take a chance at 47 (and I thought I got started late in my mid-20's...;)).

I took a quick look at your sample pages. Keep working on your drawing skills; find and devour books or classes that help you refine your style. Proportion, dimension, and line quality are areas that could use some work, although you do have samples that are very sharp and polished.

When you start applying for paying work, only show your best pieces in your portfolio. If you're not sure which those are - ask. Be ruthless in weeding out drawings that you like but fall short in the execution. Look at them as a potential employer will; without the history or backstory of the piece.

You've got some nice entry-level work up there. Good luck!

@DSB - thanks for the advice, kind words, and encouragement. Will put it to good use and dramatically increase my daily sketching starting today. Been meaning to kick it up a notch as I recognize some of the lacks you pointed out.

qery

Hi
i m 20 yrs old and learning animation from arena multimedia but i m not satisfied with the course i want to learn more professionally and with a valuable degree, can you pl z suggest something.

thanks

/v| eg |-| ;)

you're left with a few passionate people who don't care about money, surrounded by hundreds who care, and whine and remind them lest they become happy in their soliloquy.

http://www.3danimationtrainingstudio.com I still have not told my story! - Vineet Raj Kapoor

oversized child yearning for school

Hi,

I am Sourav from Mumbai, India. I have been an engineer (just did ok), am an advertising writer (doing well for myself, thank you) and an would be animator (hoping, praying and burning midnight oil).

Now for the confessions. I am 28 years old right now, single and not exactly sitting on a pile of cash. I am tired of advertising, (though I am making a pile of money) very, very, very animated about animation, and has done a basic crash course (just the basics of drawing and rudimentary Maya). I have decent drawing and storytelling skills.

Now I really, really want to be an animator. I have always wanted to say bizarre, Technicolor stories and make people agape and I have waited long enough.

I am not very excited about the animation industry and education scene in India. I want to go for a course abroad which stresses on art, traditional animation techniques, 2D as well as 3D. And it better be the world's best. (I am very keen on Europe, but that's only emotional reasons, don't know how career-worthy the continent will be.)

Now tell me, worthies, how deep a shit I am in? Shovels ready right here.

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