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So you want to be an Animator? Here's what to expect.

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Lest that anyone gets discouraged, this industry is not about lawyers and lawsuits. It's about creative work most of the time. Sure you may get knocked around sometimes, but that happens with every boxer too! So, there's not much to worry. Well, if you're caught up in a legal tangle, you can go either the way suggested by Ken above, or alternatively you can choose to Disney your challenger. Well, Walt instead of getting into challenging (and showing the other party down) went ahead and put his energies into showing himself (up), and we all know where he got. I am sure Gandhi too appreciated that kind of response. But, yes they have had access to more refined thought process than most of us.

virtualciti thanks, it will be pleasure please kindly share your story

Lest that anyone gets discouraged, this industry is not about lawyers and lawsuits. It's about creative work most of the time.

Of course, its about creative work, most of the time.

My missive was regarding the "rest of the time".

Hey, its up to talent to manage their lives. If they want to be sheep and let business matters bulldoze them over, that's up to them. Or they can learn a few things and be forewarned ( even prepared) when bad things happen.
Walt Disney was very savvy about lawyers and lawsuits, as his brother Roy drummed that into him constantly. Walt didn't ignore it by a long shot, he rode the crest of the wave of what was possible and impossible and floundered more often than not. Gandhi was also a lawyer too, and used his knowledge of law a great deal in his crusade.

I guess learning about this stuff can be handy after all, eh?

"We all grow older, we do not have to grow up"--Archie Goodwin ( 1937-1998)

There's been a numbers of posts/threads lately wherein newcomers have asked a question to the tune of "should I/can I undertake a career as an animator?".

Its an understandable concern, certainly an intimidating question to ask and have answered.

Its a universal-enough question that there's really only two ways of looking at it: you can be unsure about the enterprise and jump in full of hope, dread, expectancy and remorse.
And every other emotion imaginable.
And HOPE that you develop/learn enough to start and make a career out of being an animator.
Its been said many times before, by myself and others, that what YOU bring to this will determine WHERE you go with this, how far you go with this. If you are not "doing it" to a considerable degree already.......well.....there isn't a magical moment when it all comes together on its own. You have to do it.

The other way is different.
In the other way........you don't even ask the question.
You don't have to.
There simply is no question of it.
Doing this.........achieving this as a career is a nigh-unholy act of necessity that its as much an essential as breathing. You look at it as if you do this, or you die. There's no in-between to it. You just do it. Nothing stops you, nothing deters you. Its an absolute feeling. Your eyes are ALWAYS on the goal....no matter what life throws at you. Your lock never wavers.

This is how it was for me, how it was for a number of colleagues I know. For almost all that still work in the biz, it was always a case of wanting to do it, from the first moment, the first inkling of doing this.
It was truly a cause set in motion.
With this conviction comes action, the body starts drawing, creating, filming, imagining what-have-you. Usually this happens when the artist is young......around, say, 5 yrs old is an average--and it never lets up.

To my mind, this is the distinction between the two camps, if you will.
The former, I have observed, often take on the challenge, work to competency and gain employment, maybe having some measure of success working for a time. But they do not have the emotional stamina for the down-time, the drudgery, the abuses, the travails etc., and...........eventually, they fall by the wayside. They quit the biz and go onto something else.
Likewise are those that tell themselves they'll "give it a shot"--and they do just that. They might attain all the above, they might try their hand at school, get saddled with tens of thousands of dollars in debts from student loans etc..........and then find that the studios will just not consider them.
For whatever reason, they just don't have the level of skill or artistry that the studio demands.
They too, also fall by the wayside--and because they realize THEIR future in the biz is so bleak and forbidding that they decide its better to do something else that lets them eat, and sleep under a roof and live a life.
The third aspect is even grimmer; its those folks who never had a hope in hades in the first place. They simply do not draw, or create or imagine in any expressive way. They see the career solely as a glamorous one, and its an affectation of theirs to jump in and see if they can "play" at being an animator, so they can share in this arm's-distance-away thing they admire so much.
And of course they fail at it. The sobering reality hits home at some point, and they trod off to something else. Thankfully.

But the other camp, never sees things that way. Never.
The innate stubbornness is fuelled by a metaphorical "stone-cutters" mentality. That despite the derision of those that look on, the stone-cutter will continue to relentlessly strike the giant boulder, seeking to split it in half. The stone-cutter is smart.........cagey even, because he's patient despite whatever swirls around him. He'll rest as needed, and strike the boulder in different places as he weighs the effectiveness of his strikes. And he never stops, never gives up. There's no futility in his cause, ever. There's only determination.

One day, of course, the boulder WILL split in half. The stone-cutter knows this from the outset, so the event is not really a surprise. He saw it coming a LONG ways off. Everything to that point was just a process. The event itself is less an achievement and more a confirmation. Make no mistake, this isn't always a clear vision......it might just be an ephemeral feeling, a notion even. But everything builds to the goal.

And it never stops there. Its not just that final strike and boom its all done. The process continues, its ongoing......like breathing. The metaphor in this case is just part of the story. Its not the person, or the obstacle that is the measure......its their deed.

Someone who wants to become an animator.......who simply convinces themselves they CAN do this, will do it.

Again, there's no question of it. There's no need to ask the question in the first place, because.....well, the right person knows they were meant to do it all along.

"We all grow older, we do not have to grow up"--Archie Goodwin ( 1937-1998)

Walt Disney was very savvy about lawyers and lawsuits, as his brother Roy drummed that into him constantly. Walt didn't ignore it by a long shot, he rode the crest of the wave of what was possible and impossible and floundered more often than not. Gandhi was also a lawyer too, and used his knowledge of law a great deal in his crusade.

I guess learning about this stuff can be handy after all, eh?

Sure Ken, knowing the stuff is handy, i was referring only to the precedence. I understand that experiences vary and there are a lot of people who may get swindled. However, I was just afraid that a rookie might assign priorities wrongly. So my note is just an addendum to yours and not a diversion of path. I understand that most of the people reading this are starters in animation. So I hope they don't end up as lawyers ;-)

About Walt, he got swindled a few times with people taking away his artists and even his first character. He didn't get into lawsuits (maybe the contracts were not favorable to him) but recovered and created even better characters. Sure Gandhi too was a lawyer, but all his knowledge of law actually formed the basis on which he negotiated for people's rights, and not for any copyrights. But yes this is snowballing into the wrong direction.

So the bottomline, as Ken said, do understand the laws and remember to make contracts before starting work.

http://www.3danimationtrainingstudio.com I still have not told my story! - Vineet Raj Kapoor

Sure Ken, knowing the stuff is handy, i was referring only to the precedence. I understand that experiences vary and there are a lot of people who may get swindled. However, I was just afraid that a rookie might assign priorities wrongly. So my note is just an addendum to yours and not a diversion of path. I understand that most of the people reading this are starters in animation. So I hope they don't end up as lawyers ;-)

About Walt, he got swindled a few times with people taking away his artists and even his first character. He didn't get into lawsuits (maybe the contracts were not favorable to him) but recovered and created even better characters. Sure Gandhi too was a lawyer, but all his knowledge of law actually formed the basis on which he negotiated for people's rights, and not for any copyrights. But yes this is snowballing into the wrong direction.

So the bottomline, as Ken said, do understand the laws and remember to make contracts before starting work.

walt got swindled sometimes when someone taking away his artists and his first character is absolutely correct and then he worked more hard and created better charcters which was the formula of his success

A real eye opener

Thank you all for the wisdom.

Please help!!!

Hello all. we'll have to leave my love of animation for another conversation, for right now, i am in a dire situation.

I am taking a college course in Communications and am in need of an interview with an established animator by Monday, July 16th. When i say established, i mean that has done any work in any animation project that i can trace. whether your name be in the credits or you created it entirely on your own.
I prefer the interview be conducted over the phone, but e-mail is very much an option.

i doubt that my professor will call to check up on my source if that is a problem for you.

PLEASE. i am in desperate need of this grade.
Thank you for reading

Short Video On Animation

I found this short clip that has a animator talking about the step to becoming an animator. This is some you might wont to show to kids if they have questions about animation.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uL9E7PJlkjw&list=PL94269DA08231042B&index=3&feature=plpp_video

Animation Scriptwriting

What does it take for someone to get into animation as well as scriptwriting for animation? Is it just as hard or will I need just as much luck? Are scriptwriters in demand at the moment?

Animation

I was wondering if its possible for someone with no animating experience(so far) to be an animator? I am currently unemployed and have been for over 2 years now and I can not afford college. I have always been intrested in becoming an animator and I have been drawing since I was younger (im 21 now). Is it even possible for me to catch up and become an animator? I REALLY want to help make movies (cartoon and realistic). The only problem is that I don't draw as much as I should. I also tried going to fscj and i failed 2 classes and now financial aid wont support me and Ive had no choice but to defer my payments, which are now up to $7,000. I have not had ANY luck whatsoever getting a job, and EVERYDAY I apply for jobs and call and still no luck. I'm thinking of giving up, any suggestions? I dont think theres a way to catch up with everyone because I dont have any animation programs or adobe and I can't find any free animation programs either. :confused:

I was wondering if its possible for someone with no animating experience(so far) to be an animator?

Its always possible. The key is to start now, and do it. And to keep doing it until you gain ability to do it professionally.

I am currently unemployed and have been for over 2 years now and I can not afford college. I have always been intrested in becoming an animator and I have been drawing since I was younger (im 21 now).
Is it even possible for me to catch up and become an animator? I REALLY want to help make movies (cartoon and realistic).

There is no age threshold here.
21 years old is very much still just getting started. I have seen people twice your age start this adventure and succeed at it.

The only problem is that I don't draw as much as I should.

Well, here's the thing: if you want to be a 2d animator, you need to draw.
It's a must.
If you want to be a 3D animator, I'd say that drawing is an asset, but your ability to move the rigs and create proper motion ( and /or emotion) would be enough.
Look, drawing helps no matter which path you take. Its an easy gauge of talent, and its useful to have in your career at minimum.
If you are NOT serious about drawing at this point, then you are not serious about this as a career choice. I know that puts a lot of stress onto your shoulders, but let's not dance around this.

If you are not drawing at lot, if you are not drawing at a near-professional level right now.....then you will encounter a LOT of obstacles in getting a career in animation. Its like wanting to be a race car driver and not driving all that much.

I also tried going to fscj and i failed 2 classes and now financial aid wont support me and Ive had no choice but to defer my payments, which are now up to $7,000. I have not had ANY luck whatsoever getting a job, and EVERYDAY I apply for jobs and call and still no luck. I'm thinking of giving up, any suggestions?

If you give up, then it all stops.

That is obvious, you don't need someone to tell you. What you probably want to hear from someone is that if you keep going its attainable, and with less pain and hassle than you fear.

I'm not going to tell you that.

That is because its entirely up to you.
Your success or failure will come from you ability to focus and persevere.

Here's some advice: understand that your past doesn't equal your future.
What you've failed at before, what your current situation is......all that can change. Doing nothing will not improve things, might make things worse......but giving up and trying something else MIGHT make things better. So will keeping at this goal. As long as you move forward, in ANY WAY, you start improving your odds and options.

I dont think theres a way to catch up with everyone because I dont have any animation programs or adobe and I can't find any free animation programs either. :confused:

If you don't think you can catch up, you are absolutely correct.

If you think that you can do this, and succeed at it, you are, again, absolutely correct.

Yeah, both are true. It comes down to your beliefs here.
What is your situation, your REAL situation? What is the reality?

You have a goal in mind, but you "cannot find any tools"?
Honest truth; the tools are out there, and they can be had for free.
Find out what the tools are..... ( they are talked about here in the AWN forums, look up the past threads) and they are to be found via a search engine. Then.........shhhhhh..........if they are something you have to pay for......find it on Bit Torrent. There is software you don't have to pay for( MAYA PLE-Personal Learning Edition etc, for example) and there's tutorials for these too. Preston Blair's Walter Foster book on animation can be had off of Amazon.com for less than $2 used( plus $4 shipping)--and its the foundation of animation instruction.

Trust me, the info is out there, and just keystrokes/mouse-clicks away.

But you have to find it, learn it/use it.
It will take time, it will be "painful", it will have hassles, there WILL be frustrations.
If that does not deter you, then you have climbed the first rung of a tall ladder.
Good luck.

"We all grow older, we do not have to grow up"--Archie Goodwin ( 1937-1998)

Never too old

Not to worry Im 54 yrs old and yes ive been doing all phacets of art/animation/ music compositions since the age of 4 yrs old literaly. Im at nears end of my life due to health But this is  me and only me alone, You take everything and go go go with it and dont reflect back because youle find yourself at an old age trying to fit in shoe's that no longer fit . There is no such thing though as never too old to begin anything !!

When I was about five I

When I was about five I cartwheeled full tilt into a wall. I was just a kid, so I didn't realise it back then (and neither did my family), but when I look back on that day, I am 100% certain I gave myself some kind of concussion because I vomited a couple of times that afternoon and I was dizzy for the next week or so. 

Sometimes I wonder how many brain cells I killed that day...huehuehue

Anyhow, I do in fact have an actual question regarding animation. When I first started considering animation as a career, I thought getting a job at Pixar would be my penultimate goal, my dream job (yeah what else is new haha), but then I actually did some digging around. From what I've read online from current or ex employees, it seems as though getting anywhere (promotion wise, etc) is a lot less to do with skill, and more to do with who you know. (The approximate phrase used was something like "Once you get into Pixar, forget about being advanced due to skill. It's about who you know, not what you do".) Now obviously as a first year student who doesn't even live in America, networking presents a problem.

Furthermore, it seems as though when working in a large place like that, there's not much chance to diversify or even use the majority of your skillset, as a lot of people were complaining about being pigeonholed into certain tasks that they repeated day in, day out. Of course, speaking realistically, you're always going to have to operate within the parameters set by the client, and that's not something I particularly have an issue with, frustrating though it can be. However, the thought of monotonously going through the motions in what one expected to be the ideal job, is unappealing at best. 

So tl:dr, my question is this: is it better to go for a job in a prestigious company like Pixar, Disney, Dreamworks etc, or maybe go for a place in a smaller studio that works on things like apps and ads, but allows you a lot more freedom in what you can do. 

At the same time I am fully aware that I'm jumping the gun in a big way here, haha. Where I am right now I should be grateful for anything that comes my way (and I am) but I like to have some kind of clear goal to work towards and I'd be really interested to hear opinions on this topic. 

it will never be a detriment

it will never be a detriment to have as broad an accomplished skillset as you possibly can.  Studios like Disney, Pixar, ILM have long NOT been the destination jobs they were once considered to be, although some talents that end up there do advance via skill, and do make a good long comfortable tenure there.
It's all up to the individual.

The smaller studio approach also works, but y'know..........having something like Pixar or ILM on your resume' before you end up at a small studio is really quite a nice thing to have. The trade-offs are numerous between the two, with the stability and constancy of a large studio and long-term gig as opposed to a smaller studio with a high project turn-over rate, and more varied work.
I'm more familliar with the latter kind of studio, and the variety of jobs coming in can be lively. Working on something different every few weeks can be refreshing for the mind, but......the wing-and-a-prayer means of getting said jobs in can be intimidating.  You can literally be working one day, and out of a job the next.
Bigger studios tend to give a more advance notice heads-up when projects are winding down and people are let go. It allows for more planning on your part, and can ease talent into the job loss.

Your talent level is, and always will be, your "job security". Work to be as skilled as possible and you'll never want for work.

"We all grow older, we do not have to grow up"--Archie Goodwin ( 1937-1998)

impressive

 

Impressive demo reel you have Matt. Nice Work.

Animation Specialist / Painter

You can download these 2d

You can download these 2d animation loops after effects templates to experiment and learn. They will give you a good idea on how animation frames work. Go to: https://introstory.com

the real affect of an

the real affect of an animator for me is editing skills.

Inwhich I already have.since I am using basic editing skills and etc.

 

I beleieve to become an animator is have a motive of what movie you want to make.

 

make sure that motive is good enough for people to get interested in.

 

My motive is my movie. But I beleieve to have that motive you must be prepared for new challenges along the way.

 

That motive is your goal!! That motive must be good enough for creation.

 

do anything you want to to do and you can do it!!!

 

anything can come true if you believe.

Questions from a beginner

I'm completly new to this animation world and I just have several questions as to what exactly that I'm facing going into it.  I have been doing art since elementary school and have always just been naturally good at. Im in highschool now and in several advanced art courses  and although I'm good I'm not yet professionally good. However I heard you have to be awesome to really get anywhere in this career field.

1. My qeustion is how good? What do you have to be able to do in order to be considered "awesome"?

2. What is the pay like for starters compared to the best. I've heard so many horror stories, but the worst had to be having to work in sweatshop like conditions on little pay despite the skill.

3. Are jobs really that unstable to where you'll be job hopping a lot?

4. If I start now in highschool with internships and things will that be considered as experience for later on in life?

advice

I came across this thread as I was just doing a quick google search about the life of animators and what happens after the "big break", and I always end up on forums where its mostly about "how to get in"...

So I figured, I might as well contribute a little here and add my two cents:

Ive been an animator now for about 8 years, mostly for kids TV, and Ive been fortunate enough to have had a semi-successful career. I say semi because I never ended up at places like Disney, Dreamworks, or the others. I do have good work though done on some popular kids channels, and continue to have steady work coming in.

If I can give any advice to anyone who wants to do animation for a career, is to completely ignore all those behind the scene promos that show how studio life is like. Yes you will have a laugh here and there, and there will be the occassional fun moment your director/supervisor will be acting out the character for you while you all sit and sketch ideas. The reality however is very different.

You will be sitting on your desk alot. I mean alot alot...

Theres very little room for excuses, being late, lazy, or making mistakes that keep costing the team time. You need to be dependable, organised, serious about your work, and professional. Yeah from the outside everyones casual and dressed in shorts (during the summer at least), but dont let that fool you. It is still a job that is taken seriously, and professionalism is important. Its a wierd type of professionalism. you wont be all serious like in a law firm, but dont expect it to be like just hanging out with your buddies.

Another thing that I would advise is to practice hard, and never stop practicing.

Even after my 8 years of work, I still feel just as insecure about my skill level, and my ability to get what I want out of my performances. I always keep finding new things to explore. It might not be animation specific, it could be character design, drawing, rigging, whatever...Just dont stop learning...And keep learning, until you become so good, that you can start to be fast...because in my experience, the guys who did the work in a clean and professional manner, but were able to get things done in good time were always finding work...

And last bit of advice, keep your passion..

Like in all industries, there are good people, and bad people. You will meet people who will motivate you, push you, sometimes beyond your comfort level, but you will thank them for it later. On the other hand, you will also eventually meet bitter people, those who have had a sour experience somewhere in their careers, and start to infect others with their same views and mentalities. Dont let them get to you, and keep your passion. I know you think right now if your starting out that it can never happen, and nobody can do that to you, but trust me it can, and Ive seen it happen to others, and to myself as well. Luckily I quickly withdrew myself from the company/environment where that was happening, and had eventually managed to regain that passion which I had briefly lost due to a bad experience.

Anyways, long ramble, but I hope someone out there would find it useful somehow

BB

ps. I know Im not adding anything to the "how to get in" discussion, but I think its equally important to know this stuff for when you first do get in. 

hi there everyone.! well, i

hi there everyone.! well, i've just completed my high school.

since chilhood i've always dreamt of being an animator.

now its my time to be the one. but i am facing hell lotta problems. i live in india.i am from very small town. there is no animation schoolm,colleges etc.thats not the problem. i am ready to go far.. but not out of country. my parents are not allowing me to get into this field they say "your future isnt secure in this field,you aint go get good salary" i dont know how to convince them.?? :'( :'(

So, my ques is how much salary can an animator get.? is there any high scope.? see i to agree with the above comments posted by my mates. but i am just asking .. :P and what about good jobs. in this field..?

The most important how am i going to decide that this college is the best.? yeah one thing i forgot to mention.. i want to graduate in this field so which degree i should go after?  i am what syllabus is the best.. see,till yet i've decided to go after Bachleor in sci. in multimedia and animation. ? is this good enough.?

please do give me some tips and some guidlines.

reply ASAP

 

you are not alone!

Hey! I too am from india and will just complete my college(10+2) by march 2017.

Initially, my parents were not allowing me either. But now they have understood that this is the only field where i can do well. I just have good parents ;p

There's lots of scope in this field. Your salary depends on your skills, hardwork, the company that hires you and also on the level of education you recieve. But yes, if you put in the right amount of hardwork into the right place, then salaries in the field of animation can be even higher than what an engineer gets in his respectable job. And not to forget, there are good jobs out there. There are companies searching for good animators.

Which college is the best? I am not sure. I am searching for an answer to this question myself XD

One can't say which syllabus is the best, because normally the syllabus is same in all universities which teach animation. You will surely be taught all that's needed to progress into this field.

The degree depends on the university that selects you. Diff courses have diff degrees, so leave that on the university. I am trying for bachelors dergree in animation and masters later on.

If you have any iformation regarding any good colleges and their admission procedures then please tell me ok? Cheers ;p

What is a social life?

I'm always hearing that your social life will be limited and your best friend will be your cat. I'm already best friends with my computer... But I have plenty of room for a cat ^^

Talent Flush - Good Option for Animators

If animation is your passion and you are a good animator then you can take an action to get entry in the industry. Just upload your animated videos/pictures on TalentFlush.com that will surely notice your skill and show it with millions of people. Animators can get awesome opportunities with the help of the platform (TF), this is the source to connect your talent with your animated field.

I don't have a ton of

I don't have a ton of experience in this field, but I would assume that it's pretty competitive, especially to get good positions with well known studios (obviously though haha). 

Make sure to keep a growing portfolio of your best work to show to potential employers and colleges!

Good luck!

Earn Per View For Your Animated Short Films! http://animationcreationz.com/

Hi

Hi

Im a business graduate but I´ve been told I draw pretty good since I was child. I wanted to become an animator but chickened out and study business ( money first, dreams second they told me ).

Unfortunately I´m now miserable and want to become an animator. The big problem is I´m now 34. :(

I would really appreciate your opinion, is it too late for me to start? I believe I could do great things if I started studying. Do I have a chance starting at this age??

 

Thanks

It is ok to take a day off.

It is ok to take a day off. If you are working a few days a week, in time, you will find yourself work long hours. You are learning a new skill and that is a slow process.

So I realize I've come pretty

So I realize I've come pretty late to the party with this thread. And after reading this for three hours, I've had most of my questions answered about getting into the animation field. With it being 2014 though, I have to wonder if Ken ever wrote a book? Because honestly you could just take screenshots of all his posts and put it into book form (with pictures of course)! 

I'm still wondering though, is college really necessary? I'm 22 and working two jobs trying to pay back the one year I spent at a university and I feel like they are just teaching me things I already know. I'm by no means a "pro" but I feel like if I could just as easily teach myself and save the money, I would much rather do that. Do companies look for people with a degree or is it mostly portfolio based?

I never wrote a book, because

I never wrote a book, because I didn't want to draw all the pictures.

No, seriously......it's all here in this thread anyway, so do the screen-caps, print it out and bind it. It'll cost less, you can cherry-pick what you want to keep and I can stick by my lazy. ;)

"We all grow older, we do not have to grow up"--Archie Goodwin ( 1937-1998)

I say it's not easy, but it's

I say it's not easy, but it's a wonderful job 

3d animation shop : http://flipbookmarket.com/store

The Animator Letters Project

I believe you would find the answers you are looking for by reading the letters on The Animator Letters Project website. Professional animators have shared their stories about how they broke into the industry, how they overcame roadblocks, and their encouragement and advice for others looking to pursue their dream of becoming an animator. So much wisdom and inspiration is found in the letters. Please let me know what you think. :-) www.theanimatorlettersproject.com

Willie Downs, Creator and Editor, The Animator Letters Project, williedowns.co

i'm new to this...

Um...could someone please tell me where you're reading Ken's advice? I kinda can't find it...thanks in advance  (^▽^;)

I can't find it either.....so

I can't find it either.....so I will be watching to see what people reply to your post Nikki.  Thank you.  -Sandi

There is a search feature on

There is a search feature on this forum, that is the best way to find his posts.

How do you know when you're

How do you know when you're good enough to draw professionally?
Or when do you decide that your art can sell?
Sure, there's no end to art and you never know till you try.
Maybe it's different that when you're in the industry, you don't have time to stress over meticulous details or polishing your work because it's always about the deadlines.
But how do you deal with the fact that you're never satisfied with your work?
Like you never feel you've done your best and you can do better so you keep thinking "I'll do better NEXT TIME" but when next time comes, it's the same process all over again.

Hey fellow teenage dirtbag

Hey fellow teenage dirtbag

I'm by no means a professional animator and know that I don't know much, but if you're looking into 3d animation, blender is definetily a good start. It's free and there's a ton a tutorial material if you're willing to grind.

Sincerly, Tanky Death

Become an animator is a good

Become an animator is a good career you can jump into 2d animation for explainer videos you can become a modeling designer for 3d and much more learn maya or blender to make ready yourself for professional career

Animator at https://videoatclick.com

An animation is an art in

An animation is an art in which we deliver our inner ideas by coloring it into animation, It's a very widely used art which is liked by everyone. 

I am practicing animation from last 5 years and still, there are many things that I want to learn regarding this field.

Hi,

Hi,

Practice makes the man perfect and in the field of animation you visualization level must be count .use the best tools and keep practicing keep learning but never give up :)

3D animation is really quite

3D animation is really quite a wonderful field to be working in and if you want to be an animator as long as your creative just improve your skills alot of future opportunities can open up for you 

how bout creating a blog or a comic strip submit it on social sites ask others for improvement 

I love animation and i would

I love animation and i would like to learn too 3D animation

At this time , i create my 2D animated cartoons on my youtube channel : Children's Tv Funny

I hope you like it :)

Hi,

Hi,

I work in bank i've never studied animation but i studied the 2D animation alone at home, in the fact i create my own animation on my youtube channel Children's Tv Funny, and i'm, wondering if i can learn 3D tooo only at home ?? is there any courses ?

because i tried to bgin with BLENDER but it's really too hard !!!

 

Thank you for this Topic.

RMIT Australia: student

RMIT Australia: student question

i'm a student who's gotten into the animation and 3D design coarse.and i would like to ask 2 questions ASAP:

1. when finising off an animated short or episode, what kind of format is it usually turned into whenever its streaming on the web or tv.

2. when using the MAYA or ZBRUSH to model objects and charecters, how are they used or converted into CGI films.   

Actually i create 2D anmation

Actually i create 2D anmation that i learnt my self at home, now, i'd love to learn 3D even if i find it so difficult 

Hello Guys,

Hello Guys,
I am new to the forums

I am 18 and I want to make my career in Animation. I just want to know the things and skills required before starting the career in Animation as a beginner.
I was inspired by watching movies primarily to become an Animator.

We just launched an Indiegogo

We just launched an Indiegogo campaign for our film, Becoming A Hero and it's doing really well.  becomingaherothemovie.com. 30 minutes of the film is done in stop motion animation and  claymation. We are wanting to hire a lot of women and girls to help female filmmakers of all kinds. If you are someone who wants to learn the art of Stop Motion Animation or come work on our set, please email me at denisemoco@gmail.com. Also, some of the perks include getting to do these things so please sign up. 

Thanks!

Becoming A Hero Team

 

Animation is a relatively new

Animation is a relatively new and exciting career field with a lot of opportunities. Animators create pictures, either by hand or by using computers, for companies such as motion picture studios, gaming companies, and advertising agencies. They make commercials, movies, video games, and television shows. Animation is a modern art form that offers many job opportunities. If you've always loved animation, you can make a career out of it! Learning what Animators Do. 

1

Study the job descriptions for animators. You need to have a clear understanding of the job and its many specialties, so you can make sure you have matching skills. All animators bring characters or images to life on screen by creating a sense of motion, but they work in different fields.

  • Some animators create pictures that are used by motion picture studios and advertising agencies. Others create storyboards that are used by television and movie directors to plan their filming. These storyboards illustrate what will be seen on screen, such as where actors will stand. There are many different roles that people can play in the animation process. [1]
  • Animators create special effects that appear in movies, television shows, and video games. Animators also work as modelers, in computer animation, as painters, as game designers, and as technical directors.
  • Consider freelancing. Sometimes animators freelance on the side in different areas of the field. Image titled Become an Animator Step 2
  • 2

    Learn the personality traits needed by animators. Employers look for "hard" skills like the ability to use computer programs. They also consider "soft" skills, which are the personality traits that many animators need to have.

    • It can take many weeks to create a 10-second animation. If you don't have the patience for such an endeavor, this might not be the best field for you. Don't expect to learn the skills of animation in a couple of weeks, either. The field requires a great deal of technical training.[2]
    • Animation is fun, and many animators grew up enjoying animated video games or movies. Imagine being asked to create a fight between two Transformers! If you enjoy animation as a consumer of media, this might be a good career field for you.
    • Animators are perceptive and good observers of life and human nature. This is because they will be asked to recreate facial expressions and the way that people move. They need to have the ability to create story lines, not just characters.
    • Animators need to work well with other people. It's rare for an animator's role not to involve teamwork. There are many, many steps in the entire animation process.
    •  Image titled Become an Animator Step 3

    3

    Master the required steps to create animation. The animation process can be broken down into different sections. It involves a lot more than simply putting a pen to paper (or finger on a computer mouse). By mastering these stages, you can better choose which role you want to play.

    • Pre-production. In this stage, the animator conceptualizes the final product. An animator might create a storyboard that includes sketches of each frame and helps develop and visualize the storyline. The drawings in a storyboard often contain text describing the movements of the characters.
    • Sometimes animators will shoot reference videos in pre-production. For example, if they are going to create a character throwing a baseball, they might want to shoot and study a video of a person throwing a baseball. [3]
    • Model sheets show characters' facial expressions. These specific drawings allow animators to keep the characters' personalities consistent. Then, the visuals department creates animatics, which are simple mock ups of the visual animation. An animator will also decide on a few key poses, which are the core positions of the character.
    • Production. Layout artists create 3-D versions of the storyboard drawings. Basically, they bring them to life. Some forms of animation use modelers who shape the drawings into life. Textures provide the tiny details that make animation seem real, such as cracks in sidewalks. Rigging means the characters' bones and motion is further defined on screen. Some forms of animation use motion capture, which means an actor or actress' motion is captured and then matched to the animation drawings.
    • Post-production. There are three basic components of post-production: Compositing brings together all of the previous elements in production into one seamless storyline. Sound editing adds sound effects and lip-syncing to the animated drawings. Video editing is a process to create proper flow and storyline by rearranging images if necessary. [4]

    Image titled Become an Animator Step 4

    4

    Study the differences between animation types. Most animation is either 2-D or 3-D. To understand the difference, recall that traditional cartoons like Aladdin were 2-D and movies like Toy Story were done in 3-D and show more complex dimensions. [5]

    • To be a 2-D animator, you would draw everything you see frame-by-frame. You draw key poses. Then you draw every movement in between. Artistic ability by hand is important for all animators, but it's more important with 2-D animation. Animation usually uses about 24 frames a second. Slower movements can use 12 frames a second. In stop animation, where characters are still, you don't use many frames.
    • 3-D animators move characters like puppets on the computer. 3-D animators create a model of the character. The animator can grab controls using a computer to create nuanced movement by the character. 3-D animation requires a knowledge of graphs and curves and basic geometry. 3-D animators rarely use stop animation. They have to always keep the character in motion or it will look like a mistake.[6]

    Getting the Proper Skills Training

    Image titled Become an Animator Step 5

     

    1. 1

      Consider obtaining formal education. Although there are always exceptions, it will be easier to find a job as an animator if you obtain a bachelor's or associate's degree from a university or technical college that has a good record in the field.

      • You want to look for an educational institution that offers courses in 2-D and 3-D animation. Although some students in animation choose to major in art, finding a program with a degree in animation specifically is even better.
      • To help you select a school, look up listings and reviews of animation schools. For example, the Animation Career Review lists top schools for private game design. [7] It also has listings of the top animation schools by region. [8]
      • You might be able to choose a two-year or online program instead. The Animation Career Review is one place you can check for animation school programs. The site has a detailed listing of schools that offer animation related degrees. You should look for schools that offer majors in the specific types of animation you are interested in. For example, if you want to be an animator of video games, you should choose a school offering majors in things like "gaming design" and "3D modeling for games." [9]

      Image titled Become an Animator Step 6

    2.  

      2

      Pinpoint changing trends in the field. As technology changes, and consumers demand more sophisticated imagery, certain areas of the field offer more job opportunities than others. Study the field, so you understand where its growth areas are and how your skills best fit.

      • Reading trade publications that specialize in animation fields is a great way to embrace trends and have a better understanding of the industry.
      • Cartoonists (2-D animators) are not as in demand these days as technical animators who use computers to create imagery. Just consider how movie animation has changed from the days of Mickey Mouse to the digital complexity of Toy Story.

       

    3. Image titled Become an Animator Step 7

      3

      Consider specializing. You should probably specialize in one aspect of the field that you are best at and love most. Don't try to do everything at once. Find your animation niche, whether it's drawing by hand or using computers to create complex special effects. If you love to draw and are good at it, maybe 2-D is the way to go. If you have a mind for math and love using computers, 3-D is the best bet.

      • Universities and other training programs offer specialties in areas like game design, computer animation, graphic design, visual art, motion graphics, and entertainment animation.
      • People sometimes figure out which specialty fits them best when they are already in school. Don't put too much pressure on yourself to specialize right away. However, by the end of your schooling, it's good to demonstrate a focus.[10]
      • Specializing will help you pick the right degree program and courses. You will need different courses to be an animator for Hollywood films than you would need to be an animator for gaming. Some universities have degree programs designed along various specialties.
      • Mastering the fundamentals should not be forgotten, however. If you can show employers you also have a strong basis of the fundamentals, you will be more marketable.

      Image titled Become an Animator Step 8

    4.  

      4

      Get computer skills. This is extremely important. You should demonstrate artistic creativity, however you will be far more marketable as an animator these days if you also learn computer programs commonly used by animators. It's essential.

      • Common programs used by animators include website design software (like Dreamweaver), software used for graphics and photo imaging (like Creative Suite), 2-D and 3-D animation software (such as Studio Max, Maya, Flash, and After Effects), and video editing software (such as Premiere or Final Cut Pro). [11]
      • These computer programs can be very expensive. However, many college programs offer discounts for students.

       

    5. Image titled Become an Animator Step 9

      5

      Learn traditional art. Animators aren't just technological robots. They need to have an understanding of artistic concepts and be able to draw. This is true for people going into 3-D animation, also.

      • Traditional art training helps an animator create poses and stage shots. [12]
      • Good animators will understand how to draw by hand, how to space the drawings properly to create the motion they want, and how to create motion in their characters. In the field, this is called being a "draftsman."
      • There are jobs for animators who draw only by hand, but it's a tougher field these days. Still, taking some courses in art will make most people a better animator. Some animation-oriented companies like Pixar actually say they put as much emphasis on artistic ability as computer skills for all animators.

       

    6. Image titled Become an Animator Step 10

      6

      Obtain well-rounded skills. There are other courses and experiences you may need to be a good animator that can be found outside the specific degree programs that focus on animation training.

      • Some big studios look for animators with acting experience. They believe it helps them better capture life and movement in their characters. Remember, they want to hire you to create personality and storyline - to recreate life, essentially. [13]
      • Courses in science and, especially geometry, are valued by animators. Animators must be creative and visual, but they also need to have an understanding of geometry. [14]

       

    7. Image titled Become an Animator Step 11

      7

      Gain professional experience. Build your resume with actual work experience. This is true while you are still in college. Start then (or even in high school if you can). Animators need to demonstrate professional experience, not just a college degree, to get their first job.

      • Many animation companies offer apprenticeships and internships for animation students looking to build their resumes to get their first job. Sometimes, these are unpaid.
      • Consider volunteering. This can be a good way to build up your resume. You may have to work for free for a while, but the work will help you get a job. Many non-profit organizations would love to have an animator help them with projects.
      • You can put volunteer work on your resume and in your portfolio. Companies won't care much that you weren't paid to do it. The critical thing is to show people what you have done and can do in a very concrete way.
      • Entry-level animation jobs usually require one year professional experience at least, and you will probably need about 5 years experience to obtain a more advanced position. [15]

       

     

     

    Part3
    Creating a Portfolio

    1. Image titled Become an Animator Step 12

      1

      Create a demo reel. It's common in the field for employers to want to see your work on a demo reel. A demo reel is a video in which short examples of different animation scenes you've created plays on the screen. Some companies prefer demo reels that highlight a short segment of your best piece instead of multiple examples of your work.

      • You might want to alter your demo reel for various positions to highlight the style and training needed for that specific job. Different companies prefer different looks.
      • Demo reels for beginners should be about 2 minutes, but no longer than 4 minutes for animators with more experience. Select your best work for the reel, not every single thing you've done.Start and end with the best work.[16]
      • Some employers want to see a DVD of the demo reel, but others will accept a link to the demo reel on your website. Some companies, like Pixar, tell applicants they will send them information on what they want to see in a portfolio and demo reel when they apply. [17]
      • Use original sound in pieces that have dialogue, but avoid adding distracting music to the reel. You can use music, but just make sure it complements the animation instead of overpowering it. Some employers will turn down the music when watching your animation anyway.
      • Number each shot. The number will usually appear on the top right of the screen when each new animation segment appears on the demo reel.
      • Include a title card. This frame should have your name and contact information on it, as well as the job you're applying for. The title card should appear at the beginning and at the end of the demo reel.
      • Top animation companies are looking for creative ideas in a demo reel in addition to technical skills. Don't just do what everyone else is doing. Be willing to take chances. One animator said he wanted to use a diving shot, but instead chose a diving shot in which the character slipped and fell, to differentiate his reel from other reels with diving shots.[18]
      • Upload the reel to You Tube, Vimeo, and your website.

       

    2. Image titled Become an Animator Step 13

      2

      Provide a demo reel breakdown. Most companies will want a summary of what you did on screen written in text form that they can easily refer to when judging your work.

      • The numbers on the demo reel should match the numbers on the demo reel breakdown.
      • Tell the person watching exactly what you did. For example, if you have a ball on screen, explain whether you shaded the ball.

       

    3. Image titled Become an Animator Step 14

      3

      Write a cover letter and resume. These are two traditional job-seeking documents that many animation companies will want you to submit with your demo reel.

      • The cover letter should introduce yourself and your demo reel. You want to sell yourself in the cover letter.
      • The resume should list your education and training and places of employment that are relevant to the position, as well as any awards you have received and specific skills you possess.

      Image titled Become an Animator Step 15

    4.  

      4

      Develop an online portfolio site to showcase your work. You will need to pull your best work into a portfolio to apply for an animation job. People will want to see examples of what you have done, not just be told what you have done. A portfolio is not optional. It's expected.

      • Include a biography section. You need to give employers a sense of you are as a professional.
      • Provide longer samples of your work.
      • Make sure there is a contact section.
      • Creation a section for your demo reel and resume.
      • Study examples of real portfolio sites by professional animators. You can find many of these online, and they will give you a better understanding of the norms in the field and what the competition is doing. [19]

      Hope this helped. I have a upcoming animation film Live on Kickstarter.

      Please Visit my Kickstarter Campaign and Help Bring this Film To life by making a pledge and backing it on Kickstarter.

      kickstarter.com/projects/1069389182/the-romance-novel-1

Hi,

Hi,

I just graduated High School and Vocational College in my country several years ago and I want to pursue for basic animation coarse.

 

Hello. What are the best 2D

Hello. What are the best 2D animation softwares?

Can you show us a little of

Can you show us a little of your work

in the fact, i learned 2D animation alone at home 

Hi,

Hi,

I love animation too, never be in school for animation but i learnt the 2D animation alone at home, so i create 2d animation videos that i post in my Channel  : Children's Tv Funny

But now i would love to learn 3D animation and i don't know if i can do that at home 

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