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'Too Art for TV 6' Exhibit Opens Nov 9

New York’s sixth annual group exhibition for artists in the animation industry runs at Bunnycutlet Gallery November 9th through December 14th.

BROOKLYN, NY Bunnycutlet Gallery debutes its new space in Williamsburg, Brooklyn with the 44-person group exhibit Too Art for TV 6, New York’s sixth annual exhibition for artists in the animation industry.

Too Art for TV 6

Sixth Annual Group Exhibition for the Animation Industry Opening reception – Friday, November 9th, 6-10pm November 9th, 2012 through December 14th, 2012

Too Art for TV started in 2006 for artists who, by virtue of working collaboratively (and semi-anonymously) in the work-for-hire profession of broadcast animation, needed a public showcase for their individual artistic endeavors – no matter how un-TV they were. Curated by animation painter Liz Artinian, Too Art combined well-known animation artists with up-and-coming ones, their conceptual cohesion being an embrace of the experimental and the whimsical, with comics, animation, and illustration working as an aesthetic thread.

Orphaned in 2008 when its original host gallery left New York, Too Art continued its annual life thanks to yearly pop-up galleries, funded and organized by Liz Artinian, and built with the help of exhibitors and countless volunteers. Distinctive from previous years, Too Art for TV 6 also debuts the new Bunnycutlet Gallery, an art space founded by Liz as a permanent home for Too Art, as well as for a broader art culture that embraces figurative art, pop art, and "geek" art.

Featuring new works by 44 artists, including first time Too Art exhibitor Vincent Scala, whose large acrylic paintings combine animation, horror, and comedy with vibrant colors. Also featuring paintings by Too Art veterans Kelly Denato and Jessica Milazzo - though their work differs aesthetically, they share a unique ability to mix metaphor and humor with a beautiful illustrator’s hand. Isam Prado’s drawings, while delicately drawn, are portraits of internal distress and bitter violence, contrasted with Christy Karacas’s massive-scale drawings, which energetically explode with cats, robots, and comic violence.

Source: Bunnycutlet Gallery