SGI Demos Integration with ART VPS’ Ray Tracing Hardware

SGI workstations running ART VPS' accelerated ray tracing chip sets were demonstrated publicly for the first time at the SGI Technology Forum in Paris. The AR350 chips, configured in sets of eight and 16, are expected to be available in SGI workstations within the next two months.

Silicon Graphics Fuel and Silicon Graphics Tezro workstations are designed to address the requirements of scientific, engineering and creative professionals. The company's VPro graphics technology provides high-performance texturing and interactive rendering, realistic 3D lighting, 48-bit RGBA for 2D/3D imaging and resolutions up to 1,920x1,200 pixels at 60 and 72 Hz.

"SGI has built a reputation for its ability to meet the demands of those who require the utmost quality and speed for high-end visualization," said Brian Tyler, ceo of ART VPS. "We serve the same audience, so it is a good fit."

ART VPS's modular ray-tracing architecture accelerates 3D rendering by distributing it across an array of chips. The systems generate full-frame previews in seconds and give users the speed to take advantage of advanced 3D rendering features such as multiple area lights, accurate 3D motion blur and depth of field, secondary illumination, HDRI lighting, special RenderMan shaders and physically based materials, lighting and camera properties.

"ART VPS's chips deliver the rendering speed and realism that our customers desire," added Graham Russell, SGI's EMEA visualization marketing manager. "The combination of SGI workstations and ART VPS AR350 chips represents a very strong value for our customers."

ART VPS Ltd. (www.art.co.uk) offers hardware-accelerated 3D ray tracing systems that improve creative communication and help reduce the time and cost required to bring a new project to market. ART VPS systems are used by some of the world's leading design and manufacturing companies, including Bombardier Aerospace, Learjet, Nikon and Procter & Gamble; architectural firms such as Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, Bovis Lend Lease and Chapman Taylor Partners; and entertainment companies such as IBM Interactive and Walt Disney Imagineering.

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