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Paramount Programming Exec On Board at Spike TV

Former Paramount TV exec Robert Friedman has joined Spike TV as svp, programming, and will be responsible for all program planning, strategic acquisitions, media initiatives and original series launch projects for Spike TV.

"Rob brings his rich background of the cable industry to this position," said Kevin Kay, evp, programming and production, Spike TV. "His strong leadership, wide range of experience as a programmer and relationships in the studio and acquisitions world, will be a huge benefit to us as we continue to build Spike TV as the prime destination for men."

Friedman was svp, cable sales manager for Paramount Domestic Television, since 2000. He began working for Viacom in 1990 as a consultant to Viacom Enterprises and officially joined the company in 1991 as director of marketing and special projects. In 1993, Friedman became vp, marketing and ancillary sales. Upon Viacom's acquisition of Paramount in 1994, he served as vp, cable sales.

Previously, Friedman was vp, programming with Fox Television Stations at WNYW-TV in New York and Metromedia's WXIX-TV in Cincinnati. He began his television career in Raleigh, NC as director of research, and program director for WRAL-TV.

Friedman is a former member of board of governors, New York Television Academy and is a current lecturer in NYU's School of Continuing and Professional Studies.

Spike TV, the first network for men, is available in 87 million homes and is a division of MTV Networks. MTV Networks, a division of Viacom International Inc. owns and operates the following television programming services MTV: MUSIC TELEVISION, MTV2, mtvU, VH1, NICKELODEON, NICK at NITE, COMEDY CENTRAL, TV LAND, SPIKE TV, CMT, NOGGIN, MTV INTERNATIONAL and THE DIGITAL SUITE FROM MTV NETWORKS, a package of 12 digital services, all of which are trademarks of MTV Networks. MTV Networks also has licensing agreements, joint ventures and syndication deals whereby all of its programming services can be seen worldwide.

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