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Digital Domain Congrats To Academy Invitees

Digital Domain is pleased to congratulate Visual Effects Supervisors Bryan Grill and Kelly Port, Software Creative Director Doug Roble, and all of the 105 distinguished artists and executives who were invited to join the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences this week. The invitation honors those who have made significant contributions to theatrical motion pictures. Just 10 were chosen from the Visual Effects branch.

Bryan Grill is a 14 year veteran of Digital Domain and has worked on some of the most groundbreaking visual effects to appear in motion pictures. He is currently VFX Supervisor on G.I. JOE (2009), and recently held the role on THE GOLDEN COMPASS and PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: AT WORLD’S END. Grill also contributed his talents on FLAGS OF OUR FATHERS, LETTERS FROM IWO JIMA, THE DAY AFTER TOMORROW, THE FIFTH ELEMENT, TITANIC and APOLLO 13.

Kelly Port is also a 14 year Digital Domain veteran, having served as VFX Supervisor on WE OWN THE NIGHT, THE HITCHER, THE TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE: THE BEGINNING, and THE SEEKER: DARK IS RISING. His visual effects work is seen on twenty five films, including THE LORD OF THE RINGS: FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING, KING KONG, THE ITALIAN JOB, TITANIC, T2 3-D, APOLLO 13, and STRANGE DAYS.

Doug Roble has been with Digital Domain since its founding in 1993, contributing to the design and development of many software systems, including the track camera position calculationscene reconstruction system and fluid simulation system – for which he was honored with Technical Achievement and Scientific and Engineering awards. Roble is also responsible for a large part of Digital Domain’s core libraries and many other technologies. He is credited on THE DAY AFTER TOMORROW, TITANIC, SPEED RACER and MEET THE ROBINSONS.

Grill, Port and Roble will join seven of their Digital Domain colleagues who are current Academy members: Les Ekker, Jim Hillin, Joel Hynek, Kim Libreri, Theresa Ellis Rygiel, Mike Sweeney and Dan Taylor.

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