Box Office Report: Disney’s ‘Frozen’ Sing-Along a Hit

Holdovers dominate the Super Bowl weekend at the box office as Ride Along and a sing-along version of Frozen beat new entries That Awkward Moment and Labor Day.

Holdovers dominated Super Bowl weekend at the box office as Ride Along and a sing-along version of Frozen beat new entries That Awkward Moment and Labor Day.

Topping the box office chart three weekends in a row, Universal’s Ride Along, starring Kevin Hart and Ice Cube, took in $12.3 million for a total of $93 million.

Disney's Frozen sing-along, playing in more than 2,000 theaters, sparked a renewed wave of interest in the film, which was up slightly from last weekend. The animated family feature grossed $9.3 million from a total of 2,754 locations, including $2.2 million from the sing-along shows, for a domestic total of $360 million. Overseas, Frozen took in $504.4 million for a worldwide total of $864.4 million, edging past The Hunger Games: Catching Fire.

Marking one of the lowest Super Bowl openings in years, new Focus Features comedy That Awkward Moment, starring Zac Efron, Miles Teller and Michael B. Jordan, came in third place, taking in $9 million for its debut.

Coming in fourth place over its fourth weekend out, The Nut Job brought in $7.3 million for Open Road Films and partners ToonBox, Redrover and Gulfstream Pictures. To date, the animated family feature has brought in $49.9 million.

Rounding out the top five, Peter Berg’s Afghanistan war drama, Lone Survivor -- now in its fifth week out -- made $7.1 million for a total of $104.8 million.

Paramount's Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit came in sixth place with $5.3 million, putting the film's domestic total at $38.9 million.

Jason Reitman's Labor Day also underperformed, opening to $5.3 million and coming in seventh place. From Paramount and Indian Paintbrush, Labor Day cost $18 million to make and stars KateWinslet, Josh Brolin, Gattlin Griffith and Tobey Maguire.

In eighth place, David O. Russell's awards front-runner American Hustle continues to outpace other Oscar nominees, making $4.2 million for a domestic total of $133.5 million. 

Stuart Beattie's I, Frankenstein came in ninth place over its sophomore weekend, taking in $3.8 million for a domestic total of $14.7 million. Starring Aaron Eckhart, the $65 million genre epic, financed and produced by Lakeshore Entertainment with Lionsgate releasing and marketing in North America, reimagines the classic literary character as an action hero.

Paramount’s The Wolf of Wall Street came in tenth place with $3.4 million, ending the weekend with a total of $103.9 million.

Box office numbers were obtained on boxofficemojo.com.

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