4Kids Expands; Promotes New Execs

London-based 4Kids Entertainment International has completed an expansion of its operations that encompasses the promotion of key management and the appointments of new executives. Promoted to the position of commercial director is Helen Howells, who will focus on the company's sub-agent relationships as well as oversee its marketing and creative areas. Howells assumes her new position with 4Kids Entertainment International after serving as director of international licensing. She joined the company in 2000. Also promoted as part of the company's expansion is Richard Woolf, who will take the title of European licensing director. Woolf, who joined 4Kids Entertainment International in 2001 as UK licensing director, will be responsible for the company's associations within the local European licensing community. At the same time, 4Kids Entertainment International has appointed Julian Hosking as European licensing manager, Jennifer Lawlor as European marketing manager and Louise Elkington as UK licensing manager. Hosking, who joins the company from Promotional Partners, will work alongside Woolf in developing the company's European business. As part of his responsibilities, Hosking will help supervise the company's relationships with promotional and retail partners in local territories. Lawlor, who joins 4Kids Entertainment from Pepper's Ghost Productions where she served as international marketing manager, will be responsible for the company's marketing and communications. She will report to Howells. Formerly with BKN, Elkington will focus on UK licensing, reporting to Jane Forbes, UK licensing director for 4Kids Entertainment International. Together, the expanded 4Kids Entertainment International team will manage the company's current portfolio of hit properties including POKÉMON, YU-GI-OH!, CUBIX, KIRBY RIGHT BACK AT YA! and NINTENDO, while planning for the European and international rollout of additional 4Kids properties, including the return of the TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES.

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