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Could use some advice

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Could use some advice

I am not sure if this is the correct forum section, but I wanted some straightforward, unprejudice advice.

I have had the goal of working in the Japanese animation industry for some time now(what most people term as "Anime"), but the problem is of course my lack of animation and japanese-language education. I know only know of a few remaining 2D animation programs here in the US, and the one in the US that appeals me most is the one at BYU, but at my intelligence-level I feel that I will need to finish a lot of basic college courses here in Texas before they would consider me eligible.

The problem is Animation is practically non-existent here in Texas and so I feel even more disheartened by what some people think is an inpractical goal. It's just I feel like I would accomplish a lot more working at Studio Ghibli(yes I said Studio Ghibli) than I would waiting for American studios to return to 2D, and the random occurences like Princess and the Frog isn't gonna give me the inspiration to stay here in the US since 3D has took control over the US industry for too long in my opinion.

Anyway does anyone have advice on how to achieve my goal?

Also if I didn't explain what I need advice on.

1st. I want to take animation courses and japanese courses here in the US.

2nd. I want to work at Studio Ghibli and help make some of the best animated films ever made.

BrioCyrain's picture
Animation writer who loves...Animation!

Animation writer who loves...Animation!

your more likely to open your own little animation company than have a studio hire you. you should be aware of that. it isnt impossible to get hired but its not always the most likely outcome. what if a well known studio never hires you. are you not going to get paid to do animation because of it. animation falls in line with music and painting, it isnt a 9 to 5 type job. if its something you want to do, you will do it regardless of anything else

you can learn how to animate, take courses in animation and speak japanese over the internet but with any language nothing replaces going there and experiencing it. and you seem to have a misconception about the majority of anime being hand drawn, thats just not the case. in anime, 3d has to look and feel like 2d or it will not be accepted. that my be why havent noticed it but a lot of what your looking at is actually 3d.

Im assuming you watch a lot of anime but you can limit your viewing to productions that are only 2d. but if you venture outside of that your watching your fair share of 3d

Before jumping to any conclusions about the likeliness of an inexperienced Westerner getting hired by a prestigious Japanese animation studio, moving there without any in-depth knowledge about the language, culture and especially work environment, or yet another inane discussion about whether or not 3D is better than 2D or anime is better than Western animation - do you, BrioCyrain, have anything to show that would help people evaluate your general aptitude for animation or animation studies?
This is just me but I think regardless of potential talent, perhaps you need to adjust your priorities a little? What you wrote to me sounds a bit like, "I want to be a mountaineer but there are no mountains in the area - so which way to Mt. Everest?"

Again with something that doesn't seem like true advice to me.

Again I am saying I would rather work in a 2D environment, it's my personal preference and since Japan is practically the only place with a majority of 2D animation I rather not be forced or obligated to do 3D films since I tire of it. 3D films aren't the trash of animation but it has been overdone to an extent.

Again I want advice not comments or statements on how crazy my goal is.

Animation writer who loves...Animation!

My advice was to show what you're capable of doing now so people can give you specific advice on how to progress. Personally, I couldn't care less where you want to work. ('sides, I work in 2D.)

First of all, sorry for sounding frustrated, I'm just feeling a bit stressed about my possible career in life.

Right now I only draw a bit, and so that is why I wanted advice on animation courses at this point since I can't animate to save my life at the moment. I guess I should of made that more clear, sorry.

Animation writer who loves...Animation!

You could look into Funimation in Forth Worth and there are a number of gaming companies in Austin.

You could look into Funimation in Forth Worth and there are a number of gaming companies in Austin.

True, Funimation is one of the closest animation-based companies near here, didn't really think about it but they do bring over Anime from overseas and dub it.

I have written fandubs before actually, so it would be a good alternative.

Though my main priority is actually creating original animation, but dubs is a good alternative.

Thanks!

Animation writer who loves...Animation!

First of all, sorry for sounding frustrated, I'm just feeling a bit stressed about my possible career in life.

Right now I only draw a bit, and so that is why I wanted advice on animation courses at this point since I can't animate to save my life at the moment. I guess I should of made that more clear, sorry.

Okay, to be candid, if you only "draw a bit" then I would say this kind of career is not for you, no matter what your level of desire is.
Actions speak louder than words- an old cliche', but a truism at the same time.

Let's not mince words here. A great number of Japanese animated productions showcase the work of VERY talented draughtsmen. The level of artistic ability across the board in Japanese animation is, in my opinion, about twice as high as it is in North America.
You not only need to be good, you need to be better than 90% of the artists working on THIS side of the pond to make it over on THAT side of the pond.

If you are drawing just a bit.......you ain't got a hope in heck. Sorry.

In order to succeed at this kind of goal, you need to muster a serious intensity that.....well, it sounds like its beyond you.
This sounds more like an affectation of yours than a conviction.
Its something you'd like to do.....would like to try.

Uh-uh. That will not do it.
Based on what you have said, you'll probably need to manifest a nigh-unholy fanatic drive towards drawing. Putting EVERYTHING else in life secondary to that goal. Friends, family, hobbies.....everything.
I'm not exaggerating this at all. This advise comes from years of listening to fellow artists and what it took for them to become professionals.
The degree of sweat and tears involved, for most, is at a level most people cannot appreciate.

To give you an idea of what I'm talking about, when I was teaching I had adult students that had military experience. Each of those that had, every one of them in fact, stated that making an animated student film was by far harder than anything they did in their military service.

I am saying this to scare you, make no mistake about this.
I write this because if this is just an affectation for you, then you are wasting your time, and quite possibly the industries time. Unless you are 100% committed, you will not make any impact on the biz at all. The animation industry sees plenty of people like that already, and frankly......they don't last.
The people that make it......those that last are truly dedicated ( and probably crazy...) and they undertook the journey and sweated it all.

Really, its up to you.

"We all grow older, we do not have to grow up"--Archie Goodwin ( 1937-1998)

Okay, to be candid, if you only "draw a bit" then I would say this kind of career is not for you, no matter what your level of desire is.
Actions speak louder than words- an old cliche', but a truism at the same time.

Let's not mince words here. A great number of Japanese animated productions showcase the work of VERY talented draughtsmen. The level of artistic ability across the board in Japanese animation is, in my opinion, about twice as high as it is in North America.
You not only need to be good, you need to be better than 90% of the artists working on THIS side of the pond to make it over on THAT side of the pond.

If you are drawing just a bit.......you ain't got a hope in heck. Sorry.

In order to succeed at this kind of goal, you need to muster a serious intensity that.....well, it sounds like its beyond you.
This sounds more like an affectation of yours than a conviction.
Its something you'd like to do.....would like to try.

Uh-uh. That will not do it.
Based on what you have said, you'll probably need to manifest a nigh-unholy fanatic drive towards drawing. Putting EVERYTHING else in life secondary to that goal. Friends, family, hobbies.....everything.
I'm not exaggerating this at all. This advise comes from years of listening to fellow artists and what it took for them to become professionals.
The degree of sweat and tears involved, for most, is at a level most people cannot appreciate.

To give you an idea of what I'm talking about, when I was teaching I had adult students that had military experience. Each of those that had, every one of them in fact, stated that making an animated student film was by far harder than anything they did in their military service.

I am saying this to scare you, make no mistake about this.
I write this because if this is just an affectation for you, then you are wasting your time, and quite possibly the industries time. Unless you are 100% committed, you will not make any impact on the biz at all. The animation industry sees plenty of people like that already, and frankly......they don't last.
The people that make it......those that last are truly dedicated ( and probably crazy...) and they undertook the journey and sweated it all.

Really, its up to you.

Well, I guess saying "I draw a bit" can be taken a long way, and I actually agree that animation is something that will drive you into the ground for maybe the rest of your life, but what I really met is I draw at least a few times a week and usually spend 10 to 30 minutes trying to perfect what I am drawing since I have yet to dive into a real animation course or any other program that I can work my hands off with.

I agree that I can also say the Japanese have a very determined and talented skill for animation and from what I hear are probably as I quote you "90%" more competitive. Though as you say "crazy" people are some of the people who get these jobs, I can see me as one of these crazy people since sometimes I get the urge to go right out and go to a REAL japanese animation school, though money won't permit.

I usually take "do it as a hobby" comments as challenges, no offense since it's usually my relatives who think I am "crazy". There is probably a very rare and slim chance of working at a place like Studio Ghibli but picturing me slaving on a film like Ponyo is one of my biggest dreams.

Yes the animation market isn't doing so well but I hope by the time I enter into it it would have made a comeback.

Animation writer who loves...Animation!

your more likely to open your own little animation company than have a studio hire you. you should be aware of that. it isnt impossible to get hired but its not always the most likely outcome. what if a well known studio never hires you. are you not going to get paid to do animation because of it. animation falls in line with music and painting, it isnt a 9 to 5 type job. if its something you want to do, you will do it regardless of anything else

you can learn how to animate, take courses in animation and speak japanese over the internet but with any language nothing replaces going there and experiencing it. and you seem to have a misconception about the majority of anime being hand drawn, thats just not the case. in anime, 3d has to look and feel like 2d or it will not be accepted. that my be why havent noticed it but a lot of what your looking at is actually 3d.

Im assuming you watch a lot of anime but you can limit your viewing to productions that are only 2d. but if you venture outside of that your watching your fair share of 3d

Miyazaki films are mostly hand-drawn, some of the animation is 3D but having people say I am blind and can't see the difference is getting a bit irritating. I just prefer 2D or mostly 2D animation. Also I don't see how people can just say "It's 3D that looks 2D" when everytime I look at anime documentaries or korean documentaries I see the animators using paper or a tablet, hence I think using your hand as "hand-drawn" and that is what they do. Unless asian animators and the like are just a bunch of liars and can't be trusted?

Also saying I am better off making my own animation company when I don't even know how to animate yet and have no money to do such a thing I think is very unrealistic, and saying getting hired by a studio is less likely and less efficient sounds just crazy to me.

Animation writer who loves...Animation!

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