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Richard Williams's Animators Survival Kit as 16 DVD's

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Richard Williams's Animators Survival Kit as 16 DVD's

Richard Williams's Animators Survival Kit in coming out as 16 set DVD . Two videos showing the animated logo and it's line test here

16-DVD BOX SET INCLUDES::)

Starting Right
Timing and Spacing
Working Methods
More Timing More Spacing
Building Walks
Flexibility in a Walk
Sneaks, Runs, and Animal Action
Flexibility
Overlapping Action and Weight
Takes
Vibrates
Accents
Dialogue 1
Dialogue 2
Giving the Performance
Putting it all Together

Master has done it again...:)

http://theanimatorssurvivalkit.com/

For a limited pre-sales period only - we are giving you the opportunity to pre-order it and save 20%.

TypeRetail inclusive of VATVATRetail Exclusive of VATPre-Order (before
17th Nov)
£596£88.77£507.23Standard£745£110.96 £634.04Customers purchasing this product from outside of the European Union will not be charged VAT. So if you live in the US you will only pay $995 (approx., based on an exchange rate of $1.96 to £1) if you order it before Nov 17th.
Check the Foyles website for more details.

That's pricey, especially for a beginner like me. Is there really that much more in this DVD set that isn't it the book which I payed $30 for? I just don't see paying nearly a thousand bucks for something, if I can just read the book.

--Zach
Animation isn't an end. It's a means to an end. That end is storytelling.

That's pricey, especially for a beginner like me. Is there really that much more in this DVD set that isn't it the book which I payed $30 for? I just don't see paying nearly a thousand bucks for something, if I can just read the book.

It looks to me like you are getting thirty-two hours of lecture time from a professional so it price is cheap if you look at it that way. Schools, the industry, and hard core animator are most likely the market for this DVD set.

I would like to know if they are going to put this out in Blu-ray, if not then the should think about it for the near future. Maybe even a Blu-ray interactive set. :)

I'm surprised at how inexpensive it is, frankly. I paid around $800 in '97 to attend the masterclass on which this set is based. That it's only a couple of hundred more, ten years later, and on DVD that I can reference anytime, is astonishing!

Yeah, but it seems to me that a lot of the information from the masterclass is pretty much already in the book. Sure there are some things that seem nice about the DVD, (like actually seeing some animations playing, then being able to analyze them frame by frame), but how much more information is there?

$30 vs $900 is a big difference for someone like a student.

--Zach
Animation isn't an end. It's a means to an end. That end is storytelling.

Yeah, but it seems to me that a lot of the information from the masterclass is pretty much already in the book.

Absolutely true. I stopped referring to my notes from the masterclass once the book came out.

Yeah, but it seems to me that a lot of the information from the masterclass is pretty much already in the book. Sure there are some things that seem nice about the DVD, (like actually seeing some animations playing, then being able to analyze them frame by frame), but how much more information is there?

$30 vs $900 is a big difference for someone like a student.

I think if someone has the book and actually applies themselves to do all the examples shown in the book then they will have learned the fundamentals of how to animate . BUT it requires careful , steady working through the book. There is so much good information in there. I'm often dismayed to hear some people shrug it off as "just a bunch of walk cycles" , as though that is all that is covered in the book. That tells me they've never actually sat down to read it cover-to-cover.

On the other hand, some people are visual learners, they learn by seeing and example. From the clips I've seen on the website I'd say this is done very effectively on the DVD's by intercutting the live lecture material with the animated examples. It looks like a very effective format . I will say that when I've taught animation I've used "The Animator's Survival Kit" as a text book and sometimes I will assign supplemental assignments that we don't have time to do in class, but are based on sections of the Williams' book . Now, despite the information all being laid out clearly in the book I've found that many students simply do not read. (or don't comprehend clearly what they have read) So they keep making the same mistakes, the same things are missing from their animation which if they had really absorbed what was in the book they would not have made those mistakes. This tells me that the Tell and Show method in the DVD's is a valuable adjunct to the book. I can see that these DVD lessons will help the information to sink in for the average person a lot faster than working through the book alone. (although if you really , truly work through the book carefully then you'll get the same information.)

So, frankly , if I could afford the DVD set I'd definitely get it. The high price is worth it for the "almost live" instruction from someone of Williams' experience and skill level. I also think that the high price is probably motivated by wanting to make a bit of profit on the DVD series from the initial pre-sales before illegal copies start showing up on YouTube and on various bit-torrent download sites. Once that genie is out of the bottle it won't go back in , so he has to make something back on the series before the pirates start their plundering. The high price may also deter people from casually posting it to YouTube ; after all, if one shelled out $1000 dollars of one's own hard earned money for something, then one will tend to treat it as a bit more valuable and exclusive than something that didn't cost so dearly to begin with. It's a way of keeping the material somewhat exclusive . (and again, anyone who really wants it can afford to buy the book to get the basic material .)

Speaking of $30.00 : don't forget that another master animator, Eric Goldberg, is releasing his long-awaited book on animation, Character Animation Crash Course (with supplemental CD of Quicktime movies) on July 15. This is another must-have for any animator, student or pro. It's currently available for $23.10 on Amazon.com (down from the suggested retail price of $35.00) .

If you're going to be at the San Diego Comic Con, July 24 - 27, I've heard that Eric will be there signing copies of the book.

after all, if one shelled out $1000 dollars of one's own hard earned money for something, then one will tend to treat it as a bit more valuable and exclusive than something that didn't cost so dearly to begin with.

A thousand bucks is nothing to video pirates if they are already connected to multi-country blackmarkets immune from stringent or effective anti-piracy laws.

A lot of honest people who are on a tight budget would just have to wait until Richard Williams drops the price or start selling individual videos.

Honestly, I think that there will be a whole lot more piracy in the long run for these DVDs considering the price. If it was less expensive, there would be less of a reason to search the internet to download it.

I'm just not sure how effective raising the price of a product to counteract piracy is.

EDIT: On the side note, am I the only one on this forum who thinks that downloading movies and the like should be legal? I'm not supporting making profit on someone else's product. But in this new market, you can't stop people downloading songs and movies. I don't think there's anything morally wrong with it.

--Zach
Animation isn't an end. It's a means to an end. That end is storytelling.

EDIT: On the side note, am I the only one on this forum who thinks that downloading movies and the like should be legal? I'm not supporting making profit on someone else's product. But in this new market, you can't stop people downloading songs and movies. I don't think there's anything morally wrong with it.

Legal how? As in, paid for and downloaded, like iTunes? Or getting content for free because someone else has already paid for it? There's a big difference.

Legal how? As in, paid for and downloaded, like iTunes? Or getting content for free because someone else has already paid for it? There's a big difference.

Sorry, I should have specified: Downloading, as in for free.

I know I probably sound horrible, but I see nothing morally wrong with piracy. To me, it's just like lending a movie to someone. Of course, if you take a look at the copyright information at the beginning of The Animator's Survival Kit, it seems like Richard Williams doesn't even want you to do that.

I do however see something wrong with making profit off someone else's product.

--Zach
Animation isn't an end. It's a means to an end. That end is storytelling.

Sorry, I should have specified: Downloading, as in for free.

I know I probably sound horrible, but I see nothing morally wrong with piracy. To me, it's just like lending a movie to someone. Of course, if you take a look at the copyright information at the beginning of The Animator's Survival Kit, it seems like Richard Williams doesn't even want you to do that.

Uh huh. Piracy is all neat and fun until its YOUR media that someone else is getting for free.

Follow @chaostoon on Twitter!

This is a new market, you have to survive under these new conditions. And I seriously believe it's mostly the big corporations and major rock stars that "suffer" the most from internet piracy. I don't believe it's the little guy that's hurting from this issue. If someone downloads a movie or game I've worked on, I've gotta cope with it.

And as for the big corporations, they aren't going to have trouble feeding their families...:rolleyes:

--Zach
Animation isn't an end. It's a means to an end. That end is storytelling.

This is a new market, you have to survive under these new conditions. And I seriously believe it's mostly the big corporations and major rock stars that "suffer" the most from internet piracy. I don't believe it's the little guy that's hurting from this issue. If someone downloads a movie or game I've worked on, I've gotta cope with it.

And as for the big corporations, they aren't going to have trouble feeding their families...:rolleyes:

I’m just flabbergasted. And you want to be in the "business"?

I’m just flabbergasted. And you want to be in the "business"?

I'm a bit surprised myself that no one here seems to agree with my viewpoint. I know a few of the artists I know in real life, proffessional and amateur. From what I know, they too don't really see anything unethical or wrong with the downloading of songs, and development software for free. Especially if it's just for learning.

I'm not suggesting that anyone here should pirate software, since it's illegal. But I think it should become legal.

--Zach
Animation isn't an end. It's a means to an end. That end is storytelling.

A more affordable alternative

Hello.

If you want to try a less expensive alternative try my new online classes.

Our window dressing will change over the next few months- but the lessons won't...with a special introductory offer.

These just went live this week...

http://www.digicelinc.com/fun/index.htm

Thanks.

Note to self:

Add an Ethics 101 class as part of the required curriculum for animation students.

Note to self:

Add an Ethics 101 class as part of the required curriculum for animation students.

http://www.kimbawlion.com/rant2.htm

Now THAT is unethical.

Downloading software to learn, however...I seriously think there's nothing immoral about that.

--Zach
Animation isn't an end. It's a means to an end. That end is storytelling.

Some of the biggest selling books are actually text books for schools. If they didn’t consider it worth it and didn’t bother would you like to explain it to kids around the world why they can only learn on line illegally? Get real man. Who said learning was free? Do you want the DVDs or not? I’d love to have them but I can’t afford them so I’ll make do with the printed version that I have. Some of us have ethics built in and other don’t.

Who said learning was free?

Not that I like the education system, but that's the basic idea of public schools. That education should be free.

But anyway, I share the school of thought that information should be free and shared. (even though I'm not a programmer, I really respect Linux communities). I think it is beneficial for society in general, if this is the mindset.

And ultimately, if information is more freely shared, then more people will have an opportunity to learn, and competition will be more healthy.

So remind me when I become totally awesome at animating, to release FREE video web tutorials.

--Zach
Animation isn't an end. It's a means to an end. That end is storytelling.

Not that I like the education system, but that's the basic idea of public schools. That education should be free.

Um... education isn't free, even in public schools. Everyone pays for it, in the form of property, state, and sales taxes.

But anyway, I share the school of thought that information should be free and shared.

Music, movies, and software aren't information; they're products.

Of course public education is payed through taxes. But my point was that public education is accessible in North America. I'm not ignorant.

Anyway, I don't think there's any purpose to continue this argument. (especially since I'm terrible at arguing)
You're not going to convince me on your side of the argument;
and I'm not going to convince you to my side.

It's going nowhere.

--Zach
Animation isn't an end. It's a means to an end. That end is storytelling.

Of course public education is payed through taxes. But my point was that public education is accessible in North America. I'm not ignorant.

Which has what to do with your point that downloading entertainment content and software for free should be legal?

Which, by the way, it is - provided that the creator of said content gives it away for free. A couple of examples: Radiohead's "In Rainbows" album, which an individual could download for any price they chose, including free. Or Maya's Personal Learning Edition - a full-featured version of Maya, provided for free for learning purposes.

The distinction here is that you want the consumer to be able to determine what should be available for free. That it's a "new market" is irrelevant - theft is theft. It's no different than if you went into a store and decided that the shirt you like "should be free" and walked out with it.

I know none of this changes your mind, and that's unfortunate. Your position is based on what's right and expedient for you, whereas those who disagree with you are looking at a bigger picture, which encompasses the creators and their compensation for their creations.

Please.... don't download this song:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yz-grdpKVqg

j.

Buying the Survival Kit DVDs

If you're a student, you should coerce your school to buy it. If you're a professional, it's a small price to pay, and it's tax deductible.

In addition, he is using the profits to fund a new film. Wouldn't you like to see another Richard Williams film.

Saw Richard Williams in S.F. on Sunday - very inspiring, and the DVD set is a must-have for students and pros alike. I completely agree with Steve...

Music, movies, and software aren't information; they're products.

I guess the argument's over now, but I think this is really a key point, and an important distinction to make.

Arguing that education and information should be free is one thing, but saying that you should be able to get products -- created for the purpose of making money -- for free is completely different, and I don't think it can be justified by saying "information should be free".

I know I probably sound horrible, but I see nothing morally wrong with piracy... I do however see something wrong with making profit off someone else's product.

Do you see anything wrong with someone not making money off their own product, because someone else is giving it away?

What's the price of yer average private college?
Looking at the clips on the site this is well worth it. He articulates everything well verbally and visually. I am in awe of his articulateness as one who stammers and digresses through lectures.Now more than ever one can teach themself animation.
For me talk of piracy to a master artist and mentor to millions who has given us so much, as Houdini giving us his secrets, is downright criminal and sinful.
We're not talking about expensive software with a minimal upgrade here (something of which I am less sympathetic to spend the money) but timeless information that will never date.
If the nine old men are our grandaddies Williams is our uncle. Don't screw over family.