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So you want to be an Animator? Here's what to expect.

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thanks so much ken, i will take your advice to heart and watch those videos again and instead of being frustrated with it, i will watch it positively and take what little i can learn from it and apply it to my own work :D

i promise myself today that i will learn something new everyday, even if it is something little

i think the hardest part is seeing how good people are and being intimidated when i start to struggle or progress slow since im new and theres still a LONG way to go but i remember when i first opened up maya, i didnt think i could learn the interface but its so easy now that i learned that. so i know ill be able to be just as good if i keep learning!

the other hard thing is just being able to stay positive no matter what ,like walt disney ! he went through much worse and became a legend. theres so many things that are so intimidating when u are still new.

but really, thanks a lot i dont have anybody that believes in me and im surrounded by people that always doubt and say im going to be nothing and my house is a terrible environment with lots of drama.

but these books i got, learning about your experiences, and all the amazing animation videos ive seen have really inspired and let me know what it really takes to be a success.

so im going to focus on myself from now on and not let distractions get in my way, always stay positive, and learn something new EVERYDAY! currently i only know how to make a crappy bouncing ball and a crappy walk. i will post back next month, how much ive progressed :)

Mine was in the eyes too! I was crawling out of a doggie door in our front entrance and my sister and her friend were running by with a boombox. Slammed into my right eye and there's a cyst behind it now which over time latched onto my brain.

Umm..Score! :)

I had a rabbit bite off a huge chunk of my right forefinger when I was a kid. Does that count?

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Everyone is dealing in such absolutes, you have to be "%100 sure!". College is ABOUT exploration, and finding out what you want to do. I have a bunch of friends who went in for animation but found out they were great at modeling, or TD, or whatever! Again I am not saying it isn't hard work, because it's a ton of hard work. But it is ok to try something and decide it’s not for you. If you are in high school you should especially not know exactly what you want to do!

Again all this talk that it is impossible to work anywhere in any long term fashion is absolutely not true! I work with people at my studio that have been there for 8 + years, and don't plan on going anywhere. So yea it's possible to find steady employment at a single place, it's not all that rare. And before everyone jumps on me I am admitting that this industry does have substantial "migrant worker" side to it. But that's practically every industry. Also if you work in say LA, Bay area, or NYC (places where most of the industry is centralized), even if you find yourself looking for a job, you end up working almost down the street. You also make so many connections so quickly that it tends not to be earth shattering. Point is, don't be discouraged, it's a fantastic career and not all doom and gloom. Most people change majors in college at least once anyway, so it's not an all or nothing deal.

I totally, TOTALLY agree.

I went from Sequential Art (comics) to Film to Graphic Design to Illustration to... well, eventually to Animation. It was really that journey through majors that I figured out that animation was for me. I think the key is putting 100% of yourself into anything you do. That way you'll know for sure.

I think constructive "doom and gloom" is good, so anyone considering animation is prepared.

Really, I think it helps if you are a "self-starter". Are you the type of person that needs the warm huggy feeling of a 9 to 5 time clock and a manager telling you what to do and the Matrix like assimilation into a system, or the type of person that is aggressive and works whenever and whatever and makes his own decisions and looks at their career from the outside? I think it HELPS if you're the latter, just so you're prepared to network and bounce from studio to studio if you find yourself in that situation.

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thank a lot! be as harsh as you want , thats what makes it so helpful, knowing what u suck at and improving it. also i found out why those people treated me like shit was because they hate my mom and she loves me most so they want to make my life hell. which is ridiculous but ya my dads side is like the most weird and hateful people u could ever meet.

and ya i got caught in it my whole life. i wasted my whole childhood just asking myself what did i do to deserve all this and kept digging myself into a deep sad hole.. but im 20 now and ive decided to change. when i found out about animation being a possible career, it was one of the happiest days.. finally knowing what i wana do with life. i thought about animation all day and night. i love every aspect of it.

also i really like your strong attitude outlook about everything. thats the type of person i want to be. thats EXACTLY how my mom is like and she ended up being successful with the business she opened up and my dads side hate to see her succeed but she always does which i think is very inspiring. she never home but when she is, shes so motivational. terrible things happen to her, but then the next day its like nothing ever happened and shes happy again

u are right i really have to stop making excuses and thinking all this bad stuff, i do this unconciously. but im going to learn something new everyday now to build up my confidence.

true, the people that were so mean to me was because their life wasnt going the way they planned and i guess they decide to take it out on me to feel better. but karma got them i guess and now their life is going even worse and they still trying to screw me over telling my mom to make me go back to crappy community college for something i dont want to pursue

anyways , i been trying to draw a story board of an animation idea i thought up but i cant draw good enough. like i want to draw people looking a certain way but i dont know how to draw at all yet. i want to study people movement more and i got a book for that - eadweard muy bridge people in motion and the animator survival kit for poses but i still dont know how to draw.

do u know a good resource for beginners to learn how to draw? i just want to be good enough at drawing to be able to make storyboards that show enough detail like how i want it to show. i guess like sketching. and i think it would be really helpful to be able to draw random things i see when i go places but i just dont know how to start learning to sketch or draw. like i wana learn all the foundation stuff

hi...here is some info for you

Animation is the creation of moving pictures/
images with the help of technology and/ or
animation software. VFX refers to the creation of
visual effects (VFX) by combining real-life images
with animation using special software. We have
examples of animation & VFX all around us.

signage
Hoarding In U.P

In response to the responses about my response (I’m lost) the only thing I was saying is that to me work isn’t about making money it’s about doing what you enjoy, doing what you want to talk about, doing what you want to do for free. If you are working at something you would do for free then it is that much enjoyable when someone gives you a pay check. I hope that was understandable. I just want to be part of the animation world so bad that I would be happy to do whatever job is open.

very good advice , thanks a ton i will get that book

I would recommend "Drawing the head and figure" by Jack Hamm. Burn Hogarth books are also good but far less instructional.

Step 1: Obtain a Degree

Step 2: Gain Work Experience

Step 3: Maintain Proficiency in the Technology

And then u will be on right track to become a successful animator.

Best of luck:)

Your best piece is the jumping dwarf - it's the only one where I saw some secondary action and eases. How much figure/life drawing have you done?

2D is a difficult area to break into these days, especially as an animator, just because there's less of it being done than 10 years ago. Keep working on the drawing skills, dig into some serious life drawing so you get a better grip on how the body is put together, and keep practicing. You're off to a good start.

I have some questions, so I thought I'd post them here. Great thread by the way.

Anyway. I'm currently in my sixth and final year of Secondary School and am considering doing animation in college. I'm doing a 1-year PLC thing that teaches drawing and introduces the basics of animation, and after that I hope to move into a 4-year course. I have a few questions:

1. I live in Ireland, which isn't exactly a hotbed of activity in the animation industry. However, I have American citizenship and plan on working there. My question: would it be easy (or possible) to get a foot in the door there even though I did my education in Ireland?

2. Animation Mentor. I've been looking over their site and I'm interested in it. Their student work, if I'm being honest with myself, was leagues ahead of anything that the college I'm aiming for produced last year. Even the unfinished work-in-progress blew the completed student films out of the water in terms of animation quality. Is learning character animation from them really a viable option? What's the opinion on AM in the industry?

3. The course I'm aiming for is here: http://www.iadt.ie . I know that you probably can't tell much about it from just the description (and they don't have student work on the site) but I was wondering if anyone could give any opinions on it. There are only two animation coures in the whole country, and this is apparently the best.

Anyway, that's all I wanted to know. I'm not absolutely set on doing animation- a lot will depend on how I do in the Leaving Cert- but at the moment it's what I'm leaning towards most.

I'm gonna second what Ken and Paul said. I'm past 40, with a 20+ year marriage, an 18-year old son, and a successful animation career that spans all that time. It can be your career without being your life.

In response to the responses about my response (IÕm lost) the only thing I was saying is that to me work isnÕt about making money itÕs about doing what you enjoy, doing what you want to talk about, doing what you want to do for free. If you are working at something you would do for free then it is that much enjoyable when someone gives you a pay check. I hope that was understandable. I just want to be part of the animation world so bad that I would be happy to do whatever job is open.

Think internship.

I used to joke to my classes about those of us in the biz that had, at one time in our childhoods, sustained some kind of head injury. Y'know....anything from an actual head trauma to just wacking your skull on something and having blood drawn.

Add one more to the tally - I got shoved into a steel pole on the playground in first grade and bled like crazy.

The scar has proved handy in checking for a receding hairline. So far, so good... :D

hey ken ! i really love your advice:
“In our modern world……there’s no excuse for drama. if you succumb to the drama, you’ll have the PERFECT excuse for the rest of your life, to blame anything you try and fail at.”

when i read that i decided to rewatch the digital tutor tutorials and this time i learned so much more. its silly that all it took was someone to tell me that so i guess i didnt even know about my frustration affecting me. but i watched each video 3 times. first time just trying to understand why and what he was doing, second time i followed along and third time i wrote notes and made sure i remembered and understood everything.

before i would watch and be frustrated that the guy wasnt explaining why he did things but now i watch and figure out on my own why he does things and im learning SO MUCH MORE,( its kinda surprising) than before when i watched i was just getting frustrated more and more cuz i didnt fully understand the tutorials and would go to the next tutorial with lower confidence

anyways i got the book and i really like it for the parts that show stuff that say you have to look at stuff as if they were shapes, then it shows examples of the figures and how they look like shapes. its a great book but im looking for one based on basic figure drawing for humans and showing the techniques to drawing them basically in different poses and such

also you really should write a book i bet it would be so popular, ur really good at giving advice and im really grateful to be able to get advice from somebody so accomplished n it means a lot that u take the time to write things to everyone on here

honestly i have been dying a little everyday with learning animation on my own until i got the advice from u, it made me think different, stronger way and started trying really hard and im feeling great with my progress today so ya just wana say i really appreciate it since i dont really have anyone to help or give me advice

I work with people at my studio that have been there for 8 + years, and don't plan on going anywhere.

The 8+ years part is great, as long as they understand that they aren't in charge of the "going anywhere else" part. Lest we forget, people who had been at WDFA for 10+ years ended up having to go somewhere else when Disney shut down 2D production.

Even if you're happy where you are and don't plan on leaving anytime soon, you should always be looking ahead and planning what to do if you find you have to make a change. It's just self-preservation. And it's true in every field, not just animation.

oh ok i see what u mean, and thanks so much! i read the book description and it sounds perfect for me since im on my own. im going to get that book, i havent read any book like that before and ya im going to work really hard everyday i will just think about animation and block everything else out :)

edit: woow that motivation book is so good i only read like 20 pages and its changed me so much in many ways and made me realise im capable of doing so much more so thanks a ton for such a great reference

i hate how everything is so greedy..... what happend to making cartoons for fun or disney who put all the money he made back into his company

i mean maybe i should go the route of making a cartoon series direct to dvd like a few cartoons do

i actually work for a lawyer lol! and also i am a webdesigner who animates on the side, buts its my big dream

i can sell a website to anyone, im a pretty good salesman, i just need to turn that into a cartoon salesman!

thank you for all the help

Thanx!

Normal, I wanted ro let the gravedigger run away completely differend (turnaround and let him stumble a little longer) but my teacher advised me not to do it, because it would take to much time.

On the one hand he was right, because we have a lot of work for school (and I'm also busy on a comicstrip for a music group) but on the other hand I'd rather wish I'v done that because it would have been really cool :D

One thing to keep in mind is that everyone has flaws. There have been times when I have been treated badly by colleagues whom I respected up to that point. There are times when I have let-down others too.
I have seen people go from being friends to becoming distant accquaintances to people who will not return even the time of day.
That kind of thing hurts, but its part of life anyway.

Amen......

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Hey I'm just wondering what quality of demo reels are the average for 2D animation universities. I'm working on some projects, but I don't know how high the bar is. Regardless, I'm pushing myself to the limit, but I'm wondering if most are handing in feature-length fully colured "Lion King" style films or whatever for admission.

I'm gonna reveal something scary...........like WEALLY SCAWY scary.

I used to joke to my classes about those of us in the biz that had, at one time in our childhoods, sustained some kind of head injury. Y'know....anything from an actual head trauma to just wacking your skull on something and having blood drawn.

I used to joke about this, and asked how many had sustained such a thing.........until I started noticing that the students that said "no" or were confused by the question were the ones that didn't make it in the biz.

Oh thank goodness! I've banged my head on a radiator and watched my blood pour into my lap AND fallen straight on my head from the top bunk! Now if only I knew where to go for grad school...

My Dad worked at Boeing for 33 years!

...and was distressed everytime that I was layed off from various ad agencies in Seattle (18 years = MANY layoffs!), so needless to say, he was distressed alot!

If the agency lost a major client, and you were the Art Director or Writer, you best watch your back! And the trickle down factor was there as well for all supporting e-pro's, and Account Exec's (Suit's)...

So now LOT'S off people get to enjoy this fun and exciting life style!

(What's really sad is...that I love it!)

The Wife would prefer I go "In-House" somewhere to find that 33 year job...

:confused:

...still lookin'!

Splatman:D

I want to do 3d animation. But I want to self prepare for what is going to come at me in the future. So how exactly do I prepare for the animation world? I already am frantically taking all the art classes and am now starting on computers classes. I've been searching the internet for all possible answers.. including here. So what exactly should I do to prepare myself? Which softwares should I get familiar with now so when I get into the big courses I can use that time to get all the bugs out when the time comes. I don't want to use all that time learning the stuff. I don't just want to be familiar with the software..I want to be an expert in the software. Also what books/sites are there chalked full of information about animation? Should I go to all the latest animated movies? What exactly do I need to do. Anything from you guys would be very appreciated.

"You can never be a real winner if you've never been a loser" -DPoV

saying you only do it cause you can and only for money is really is a downer, ive been animating on the side for the pure love it of, and if I was paid to do it would be more then just cause I can

I love art, art fills a gap in my life, and im sure others too

if people wanted to make money just for a living there are plenty of desk jobs and other 9-5 jobs available

whenever I bring a character to life, its a great feeling, if you lost touch to that im sorry for you. what I have been reading is that most animators make anywhere from 25-60k a year. the job I have now I get about 35k yr, I would rather do something I love and reinvest that money back into what I love and with the left over pay for things like rent and food

money is money, it is the root of evil I don’t need it nor really want it
im happy with what I have and what I don’t have but my dream is to be a 2d animator for a cartoon series

maybe im a rare case, or maybe its because I grew up poor, but all I know I love animation and creating animation even if it sucks

I didn't read all of Ken's last post. It's to damn long and I have to get back to work too.

I think Ken does love his work, but it's not a blind love like a lot of young up and comers have. He doesn't have that, "I love animation so much I'd do it for free," attitude that some people have. He as well as most people has bill to pay and a family to raise and take care off.

I still love animation. I love seeing the characters live and think and act once I get through animating. I guess I'm still young and idealistic enough to be picky about my jobs. I have certain standards that I won't cross. I work at a studio so I don't have the choice of what shows I animate but I choose this studio because I like the work that they put out.

Back to Flash cartoon's original question. You are kind of putting the cart ahead of the donkey with this. Most studios won't buy a series if it's already done and not aired in an established market. For new shows, they want a story outline with a couple of brief episode ideas. That way they can tweek the show to what they feel would be best for their network. If you already animated it, they can no longer do that. The best way would be to go that route and save your money and not hire all those animators to make your show.

You could try like a very short pilot on the internet. Studios don't seem to take internet shorts as solidified shows so they can still tweek them. But I kind of think that time has come and gone for the webshort to TV show.

Aloha,
the Ape

...we must all face a choice, between what is right... and what is easy."

im sorry if i offended you in anyway, i am an outsider and probably never get to your level or even in a real animation studio making cartoons

it is sad to know that its committee run, ive already read about this and know but its still sad to see that everything in america is the same

i just hope i dont sound like im coming off as a jerk, cause im far from it! :eek:

im lucky im still young and have no family to take care of, or house payments, im a renter and probably will always be. I also make money from hosting so i can live anywhere and have income so i can animate as a hobby i hopefully after i save alot will try to goto www.vanarts.com to learn more, they put you in a deadline situation and get you ready for the tough animating times ahead

ken what cartoons have you worked on? if you can say?

i actually spoke with you ape before, and thought it was amazing you worked on fosters and hi puffy are you still working on that show (hi puffy)?

its great to come here to talk to the real pros who are in the biz, but its also sad to find out the truth in the animation world

I think it's actually really motivating to see how -much- leniency exists, given how much arse-clenching goes on in other similar industries. There's as much a compromise as is possible given the business-driven desires at stake. You'll see that when you go to school. They should have your best interests at heart, but they do until it encroaches upon their ability to make money. The actual industry, if anything, is an improvement because at least it's got a humanistic core, even if the surface wrapper is "staying afloat and procuring a profit."

Doesn't phase me though. It can be an inconvenience but it could be far worse...it could be way less supportive. Just do the best you can given the existing structure...work within the paradigm.

I'm doing that come summer. As for money, I'm still churning out rough work and illustrating for small cash. Really small cash. I'd like to think I could garner something from a few contests, entering for multiple prizes. The money issue is rather daunting, but spending the next four decades of your life might as well be something you like, true. "Echo"

Thank you for hearing me out and giving me this advice..!
It's very relieving to know that its normal to be unsatisfied with our work because I always feel like I'm surrounded with people who are confident in what they are doing :|
Or don't show that they can be insecure over their art as well.
Every time I voice something similar to my question post, they give me all sorts of suggestions on trying to fix my work OR they just do the "Your art is fine, stop whining."
Neither is helping really.

Ahah yeah, it's really awkward when I have to submit a really sloppy work for something... And not being able to look at the person in the eye, etc...

Okay I'll start asking more questions when I see a piece I like, sounds like a more productive way to look at things than just raving about it than feeling awful not being able to be up that level (O v O ; )

EDIT:
Recently, I was given the advice to send out portfolios before I graduate so I have the chance on fixing it and not panicking about jobs after college.
I've been looking around and googling but nothing really relevant has popped up yet. (Still searching!)
In any case, may I have some advice on what to put in a portfolio for 2D animation?
What are the mistakes people usually do when creating a portfolio? Or the unnecessary additions they did?
Thank you again.

This Is A Must See

"On The Lot" is a must see summer show. Watch as twenty-something year old film makers get their beating heart ripped out on national television.

C'mon Wontobe - at least these people are getting some exposure. I doubt anyone held a gun to their head and made them apply for the show, and by now if anyone should know how a reality show elimination works, it should be someone who wants to tell stories for a living.

Frankly, I think they're being treated far better than some reality shows treat their contestants.

What will really counts is artistic ability, because without it, you are useless to the indistry. If you cannot create an appealing
Again, having a certificate that says you've learned some software and taken some course means nothing if you do not have artistic ability to back those up. Take your time and learn the skills properly, and develop your talents to the best it can be.

Well Before high school, I used to aspire to become an industrial designer, Design new and upcoming automobiles and stuff. It wasn't until this year that I found animation. I fell in love with computer animated films and animation in general. In my town, there's not a whole lot of opportunity. with only 550 people (population probably rounded up), best you can do is try and get a scholarship of some kind. with job opportunities comes art. There wasn't really an art program at my school. And since my parents didn't draw or paint I taught myself. I don't know how much of potential I have, but I drew this during Social Studies class while we were watching something on the French and Indian war. This is the only one I could pull up right now because I'm on vacation in MO. But please tell me what to work on. I had my first art class this year and So I'm probably not as great as I could be but I'm trying. I want to be the best I can possibly be you know?

"You can never be a real winner if you've never been a loser" -DPoV

Is that referenced from something, like a photograph? The construction's pretty deliberate in places, and the reflections would be amazingly organic for something off the top of your head.

I'm gonna reveal something scary...........like WEALLY SCAWY scary.

I used to joke to my classes about those of us in the biz that had, at one time in our childhoods, sustained some kind of head injury. Y'know....anything from an actual head trauma to just wacking your skull on something and having blood drawn.

I used to joke about this, and asked how many had sustained such a thing.........until I started noticing that the students that said "no" or were confused by the question were the ones that didn't make it in the biz.

Hit in the head with a hoe.

“Who cares what a bunch of fourth graders think you’re doing what you want to do with your life and that’s the only thing that matters…” -Homer Simpson. True words from a true roll model.

I would love to do an internship although I need to make enough money to get myself from hear in a suburb of Chicago to within driving range of a animation studio willing to give me a chance.

3D animation is essentially puppetry, once the virtual object is built, a chimpanzee can pretty much move the thing.

Sure, just like a chimp can make marks with a pencil. And like making marks with a pencil, it takes someone who knows what they're doing in 3D to go from that basic level to creating a compelling performance and a believable character. Just like in 2D.

I completely agree about the benefit of a broad artistic background; hell, I've built my career on it. The key to a long, successful career is having a range of skills, both traditional and digital.

Also agree about the software. The only time you need to be an expert is if you're going for a TD job. Beyond that, learn what you need to know to do what you're trying to do, and add to the knowledge base as necessary.

Is that referenced from something, like a photograph? The construction's pretty deliberate in places, and the reflections would be amazingly organic for something off the top of your head.

yes, I drew that from a photo. I'm creative but I don't have a photographic memory. And I don't always draw from photo's. I do still life drawings as well. But I drew that in 8th grade so the front rim looks bent. and some of the things on it are bad. But That was a while ago before I took an art class.

The only time you need to be an expert is if you're going for a TD job. Beyond that, learn what you need to know to do what you're trying to do, and add to the knowledge base as necessary.

Do you know exactly where I can find the information you're talking about? And what exactly is a TD job. I'd just like to know.

"You can never be a real winner if you've never been a loser" -DPoV

I'm not sure exactly what you're asking for. What I meant was, learn the basics of whatever software you're interested in, then add the skills you need to accomplish the task you've set for yourself. For example, if you wanted to be a modeler, you'd need to familiarize yourself with the modeling tools in whatever package you're using.

A TD is a technical director. That's the general job title for the folks that set up characters and such for the animators to animate, or those who write shaders, or those who set up lighting in a scene, etc. A TD usually needs to be more expert in the software package than the average animator does.

thanks! and wow thats alot of credits you got there

also i hope james bond jr. comes to dvd ive been waiting for that

im sure you met some of the greats?? i mean if you worked on pink panther and ren and stimpy you probably met people like John K etc etc

any books you really recommend? right now im doing lessons in Hart's Animation Studio and Preston Blairs Animation I

What are the important key programs to know in order to keep up with the 2D or 3D animation industry?

Hi everyone.
Well; the most important thing that I had listen here (AWN forums); is that you have to do another stuff and not just animation; dont put all the eggs in the same basket, get in anothers graphic design aspects, and maybe in another kind of bussines.

I am in a -thirdworld- country and when I talk about animation; is like "anim-what?"; that industry here... doesn't exist. But I definitively will be in this bussines, in the industy... at another country (of course). With a little lucky someday I will go to Canada or Europe to seriusly study animation, i recently buy the "animation survival kit" and I also read all the stuff about animation I can find on internet.

My country... when you hear the word "marihuana" which country bring out your head? (tip: is not mexico)

Actually.. a Technical Director is what I was actually aiming for. I don't just want to animate stuff. I'd want to set up characters and lighting effects like that rather than just animate. I also am wondering whether I should download Maya PLE when I get back. I know a friend who tried but didn't know what to put for a company. I'm thinking I'm going to use Maya when I get into the seriousness of 3D animating, but please correct me if I'm wrong. I was just wondering if you knew any websites that tell you everything about the software or anything. Hope that helps you're explanations.

"You can never be a real winner if you've never been a loser" -DPoV

I Dream to Be A 2D Animator?

i wanna go to 2D Animation and also write up stories to pitch up to many networks. i live in England and wanna really move to America to persue this career. does anyone have any advice on how to prepare?

Message By Echi Echi :D :) :) :cool:

Visit My new album website

My Gallery of My Characters, My Toons, My Life

If you're young enough, hit yourself in the head with a baseball bat, then proceed... :D

Questions

Hi, I'm new to these forums and I'm thirteen. I was just wondering. How would you be able to draw directly over 3D frames? And do any of you know of any free 3D software I could possibly use?:)

Hi, be sure to check out my blog! A few thing there, and I'll also be putting some of my work (pictures and short carttons) there too in the future: http://ukracattack.blogspot.com:)
I am also making a Flash animated cartoon that I plan to air on it's website in Fall 2008. It's called Tednut and it's about an personified peanut named Ted and his friend Kernal, and their basic adventures in their town of Sleepy Oaks, New York: http://tednut.sampasite.com:D

i live in England and wanna really move to America to persue this career. does anyone have any advice on how to prepare?

There is no preparation for America. Because, in America...no one can hear you s c r e a m. :D

complete and utter beginner

Hello everyone, I originally wanted to be an architect but after being in a 2-yr Computer-Aided Drafting program at a technical college in Atlanta I changed my mind towards the end. I did High School in the Caribbean and the closest thing to animation on my island (Dominica) was Technical Drawing:( so I came to America with no experience in art classes. I can sketch pretty well though, I'm particularly good at reproducing images and doing still life, ofcourse all of those skills I had to develop on my own.

What would be the best direction to move in terms of getting into the industry for me? I know it's not completely hopeless. I've been reading up as much as I can on animation magazines and drawing books so that I can get as much information as to what I'm getting myself into.

The crazy thing is I got into SCAD but I seriously lack the funds to actually start a quarter there.:o

Can somebody please give me some words of wisdom?:confused: I'd really appreciate any kind of help.

There is no preparation for America. Because, in America...no one can hear you s c r e a m. :D

Mostly because everyone else is screaming. (Hey, if Dubya was my president, I'd scream too).

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Welcome RJ. Don't know what you mean about drawing over 3D frames - do you want to add 2D elements or make the 3D look 2D? Or maybe something else?

There are a couple of free 3D packages that come to mind. The best-known and most widely used is Blender. It's very robust, but has a somewhat complex interface:

http://www.blender.org/

Another free package is Anim8or. It's significantly simpler to get started with, but isn't nearly as versatile as Blender:

http://www.anim8or.com/

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