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Halo: Anime Style

The transformation from game to animated movie is growing increasingly common. It’s usually driven by a title’s notoriety. Some translate well. Others do not. Enter Halo, one of the most popular franchises in the gaming world.

Halo Anime

Halo Anime

The transformation from game to animated movie is growing increasingly common. It’s usually driven by a title’s notoriety. Some translate well. Others do not. Enter Halo, one of the most popular franchises in the gaming world.

At this year’s Comic-Con, being largely a writer at play in the fields of anime, I was curiously invited to an Xbox event at the Omni Hotel. Much to my surprise, I found myself sitting across a table from not only Frank O’Connor, Development Director of the Halo Team, but also Shinji Aramaki. Shinji Aramaki, renowned anime mech designer (Bubblegum Crisis, Mospeada, Megazone 23) and director (Megazone 23, Appleseed, Appleseed EX Machina)! I knew this had to be good.

I was right.

The Halo Team and Studio Bones have collaborated to create seven anime episodes based on the Halo Legends canon. Due to drop this Fall on Xbox Live and Halo Waypoint, I’m f’ing excited! Based on the clips I saw, I’m chomping at the bit. This is hand drawn, refined anime that harkens back to the sumptuousness of Bubblegum Crisis and Macross: Do You Remember Love?

And while you’ll recognize the Halo canon, be prepared for new characters and new weapons.

Needless to say, I asked if this was a limited endeavor. Well, the Halo Team is wisely playing it cool. But, with the thousands of years that canvass the Halo Legends saga, the material at their fingertips is seemingly endless.

In depth info at this time obviously remains under wraps.

Warner Bros will begin distribution of the DVD in early 2010. However, I’ll definitely hit the streets and dig up more info before its initial release on Waypoint and Xbox Live.

Whether they like it or not, anime fans and gamers are about to spoon like never before.

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